Richland County, South Carolina Genealogy

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Guide to Richland County, South Carolina ancestry, genealogy and family history, birth records, marriage records, death records, census records, family history, and military records.

County Facts
County seat: Columbia
Organized: March 12, 1785[1]
Parent County(s): Camden District[2]
Neighboring Counties
Calhoun  • Fairfield  • Kershaw  • Lexington  • Newberry  • Sumter
See County Maps
Courthouse
South Carolina, Richland County Courthouse.png
Location Map
Sc-richland.png
Adoption

County Information[edit | edit source]

Description[edit | edit source]

Richland County was probably named for its "rich land." The County is located in the central area of the state.[3]

County Courthouse[edit | edit source]

Richland County Courthouse
1701 Main Street
Columbia, SC 29201
Phone: 803-576-1950
Richland County Website

County Pronunciation
Hear it spoken[4]

Richland County, South Carolina Record Dates[edit | edit source]

Information for this chart was taken from various sources, often containing conflicting dates. This information should be taken as a guide and should be verified by contacting the county and/or the state government agency.

Known Beginning Dates for Major County Records[5]
Birth* Marriage Death* Court Land Probate Census
1915 1911 1915 1793 1865 1787 1790
*Statewide registration for births and deaths began in 1915. General compliance by 1918.

Record Loss[edit | edit source]

  • A fire during the federal occupation of Columbia in February 1865 destroyed the courthouse and most of the records in it. Most of the equity and probate records, however, had been safely removed. Deed books suffered heavy record losses. Records of Columbia Equity Circuit District are housed in Richland County.
  • For suggestions about research in places that suffered historic record losses, see:

Boundary Changes[edit | edit source]

Populated Places[edit | edit source]

For a complete list of populated places, including small neighborhoods and suburbs, visit HomeTown Locator. The following are the most historically and genealogically relevant populated places in this county:[8]

Cities
  • Columbia
Towns
Unincorporated communities
  • Arthurtown
  • Boyden Arbor
  • Capitol View
  • Eau Claire
  • Fairwold Acres
  • Harbison
  • Hilton
  • Horrell Hill
  • Killian
  • Kingville
  • Leesburg
  • Lykes
  • Mountain Brook
  • Olympia
Census-designated places


History Timeline[edit | edit source]

Resources[edit | edit source]

Bible Records[edit | edit source]

  • Family Bible Records: South Caroliniana Library database containing family bible records containing from the late 1700s to the late 1900s. The Bible records contain information on births, marriages, deaths, and other family events.

Biographies[edit | edit source]

  • Hopkins, Laura Jervey. Lower Richland Planters : Hopkins, Adams, Weston and related families of South Carolina.  120 pages. Hopkins, South Carolina : Hopkins, c1976. Adams, Boydkin, Hopkins, Claytor, Weston, Goodwyn.  This book can be found at Richland Library.

Business, Commerce, and Occupations[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries of Richland County, South Carolina online and in print
Tombstone Transcriptions Online
Tombstone Transcriptions in Print (Often more complete)
List of Cemeteries in the County
See South Carolina Cemeteries for more information.

Census Records[edit | edit source]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1790 3,930
1800 6,097 55.1%
1810 9,027 48.1%
1820 12,321 36.5%
1830 14,772 19.9%
1840 16,397 11.0%
1850 20,243 23.5%
1860 18,307 −9.6%
1870 23,025 25.8%
1880 28,573 24.1%
1890 36,821 28.9%
1900 45,589 23.8%
1910 55,143 21.0%
1920 78,122 41.7%
1930 87,667 12.2%
1940 104,843 19.6%
1950 142,565 36.0%
1960 200,102 40.4%
1970 233,868 16.9%
1980 269,735 15.3%
1990 285,720 5.9%
2000 320,677 12.2%
2010 384,504 19.9%
Source: "Wikipedia.org".

For all existing and online Federal population schedules of South Carolina, see South Carolina Census. See also USGenWeb Census Project, South Carolina, including links to transcribed files.

Online Census Records and Indexes

  • 1829-1920 - South Carolina, State and Territorial Censuses, 1829-1920 at FamilySearch — index and images
  • 1840 A Census of Pensioners for Revolutionary or Military Services: With their Names, Ages, and Places of Residence, as Returned by the Marshalls of the Several Judicial Districts, Under the Act for Taking the Sixth Census. Washington, D.C.: Blair and Rives, 1841. FHL Collection 973 X2pc 1840; FHL Collection 2321; digital version at Google Books. See South Carolina, Richland District on page 142.

Some Publications

  • 1820 National Archives. Indexes to Manufactures Census of 1820. 1920; reprint, Knightstown, Ind.: Bookmark, 1977. FHL Collection 973 X2m 1820; digital version at Lineages. Includes this county.
  • 1850 Buff, L.H. The Richland District (SC) 1850 Census. Lexington, S.C.: Lexington Genealogy Society, 2000. FHL Collection 975.771 X2r 1850

Church Records[edit | edit source]

List of Churches and Church Parishes

Baptist

  • Columbia - minutes, membership rolls, etc. available on microfilm at the University of NC Davis Library (Serial 1-1274).

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

  • Columbia

Court Records[edit | edit source]

Directories[edit | edit source]

Columbia, SC city directories provided by South Carolina Digital Library.

Emigration and Immigration[edit | edit source]

Ethnic, Political, and Religious Groups[edit | edit source]

For plantations, local communities and more, see Richland County, South Carolina African Americans

Funeral Homes[edit | edit source]

Genealogies[edit | edit source]

For a bibliography and other information, see Richland County, South Carolina Compiled Genealogies

Guardianship[edit | edit source]

Land and Property Records[edit | edit source]

Because South Carolina was an agricultural state, many residents owned land. For earliest records, search 1) Charleston District, 2) your ancestor’s residential district, 3) neighboring districts, 4) the residential county, 5) neighboring counties. Not all districts and counties kept records. See also South Carolina Land and Property.

Online Land Records and Indexes

  • Plats For State Land Grants 1784-1868. This series consists of recorded copies of plats for state land grants for the Charleston and the Columbia Series with their certificates of admeasurement or certification. All personal names and geographic features on these plats are included in the repository's On-line Index to Plats for State Land Grants.
Tracing Land Currently in Richland County with Parent Counties and Districts [9]
Date Government Office  
1868-present Richland County (new)
1865-1868 Richland District
1800-1865 Richland District Records Destroyed **
1785-1800 Richland County(old) Records Destroyed **
1769-1785 Camden District *
1719-1769 Charleston District
1710-1719 Proprietary Land Grants
 
* Some Camden District records are included with Kershaw County records
** Substitute for lost records taken from equity suits Plats For State Land Grants 1784-1868, mentioned above.

The South Carolina Constitution of 1790 required the surveyor general to maintain offices in both the new capital at Columbia and in Charleston. The surveyor general began to use separate volumes for recording plats in his Columbia office in 1796. Before that, all plats were recorded in the set of volumes begun in Charleston in 1784. After 1796, most plats for land grants in the Upper Division of the state were recorded and filed in Columbia. The surveyor general chose to make the Columbia volumes a continuation of the state plat volumes begun in Charleston and gave the initial Columbia volume the number thirty-six to correspond with the number of the volume that had then been reached in the Charleston series. As a result, there are volumes numbered thirty-six through forty-three from each office, but the records in them are not duplicative. Also included are the Plan Books containing Plats and Plans.

Local Histories[edit | edit source]

Online Histories

Bibliography

  • Moore, John Hammond. Columbia and Richland County: A South Carolina Community, 1740-1990. Columbia, S.C.: University of South Carolina Press, 1993. FHL Collection 975.771 H2m.
Reviews:
  1. By Edward J. Cashin in The South Carolina Historical Magazine, Vol. 94, No. 3 (Jul. 1993):213-214. Digital version at JSTOR ($).
  2. By G. Wayne King in The Journal of Southern History, Vol. 60, No. 2 (May 1994):366-367. Digital version at JSTOR ($).
  3. By Rodger E. Stroup in The Journal of American History, Vol. 81, No. 1 (Jun. 1994):242-243. Digital version at JSTOR ($).
  • Moore, John Hammond. Columbia and Richland County: a South Carolina Community, 1740-1990. (Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, c1993). 521 pages. Family papers, reminiscences, institutional histories, census returns, official and unofficial documents, files of local newspapers, personal recollections and casual conversations have all contributed to this history. Book found at FHL 975.771 H2m and Other Libraries
  • Shoolbred, Florence Wilson. Places and People of Interest in Lower Richland. 23 leaves. Communities, churches, early schools, homes and plantations, Hopkins, Eastover, Congaree, Acton, Eastover area, Gadsden, Wateree. Article can be found at Richland Library.

Maps and Gazetteers[edit | edit source]

Fairfield CountyKershaw CountySumter CountyCalhoun CountyLexington CountyNewberry CountySC RICHLAND.PNG
Click a neighboring county
for more resources


Migration[edit | edit source]

Early migration routes to and from Richland County for European settlers included:[10]

Military Records[edit | edit source]

General

  • "Fort Jackson Military Reservation Cemetery List," Columbia Chronicle, April 1999. Columbia Chapter of the South Carolina Genealogical Society: Columbia, SC.
  • "Seminole War troops, 1836," Columbia Journal, December 1984, Issue 9. Columbia Chapter of the South Carolina Genealogical Society: Columbia, SC.

Revolutionary War

  • "Revolutionary Soldiers Receiving Pensions, Lists, 1818, 1832," Columbia Chronicle, April 2004. Columbia Chapter of the South Carolina Genealogical Society: Columbia, SC.
  • "Annuities for Those Injured in Service, 1778-86," Chester District Genealogical Society Bulletin, September 1985, Volume 8, Issue 3. Chester County Genealogical Society: Richburg, SC. FHL Collection

War of 1812

  • List of Pensioners on the Roll, January 1, 1883; Giving the Name of Each Pensioner, the Cause for Why Pensioned, the Post-Office Address, the Rate of Pension Per Month, and the Date of Original Allowance... Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1883. FHL Collection 973 M2Lp v. 5; digital versions at Google Books and Internet Archive. [See Vol. 5, South Carolina, Richland County, p. 188. Identifies War of 1812 veterans living in this county in 1883.]

Civil War

Regiments. Civil War service men from Richland County served in various regiments. Men often joined a company (within a regiment) that originated in their county. Listed below are companies and regiments that were formed of men from Richland County:

- 1st Battalion, South Carolina Sharpshooters, Company A (also known the Union Light Infantry and German Fusiliers) and Company B (also known as the Sumter Guards)
- 1st Regiment, South Carolina Artillery, Company A (also known as Calhoun's Battery; Sumter Light Artillery, Sumter Battery, Preston's Battery, Blake's Battery and other name variations)
- 1st Regiment, South Carolina Infantry (6 months, 1861), Company A (also known as the Richland Rifles)
- 1st Regiment, South Carolina Infantry (Butler's) (1st Regulars), Company B (also called Company E)
- 1st Regiment, South Carolina Infantry (McCreary's) (1st Provisional Army), Company C (also known as Richland Guard or Richland Rifles) and Company A (also known as Richland Rifles)
- 2nd Regiment, South Carolina Infantry (2nd Palmetto Regiment), Company A (also known as Governor's Guards) and Company C (also known as Columbia Grays)
- 2nd Regiment, South Carolina State Troops Junior Reserves (State Militia), Company A and Company F
- 2nd Regiment, South Carolina Cavalry, Company A (also known as the Boykin Mounted Rangers and Hampton Scouts), Company C (also known as Hapmton Detachment and Congree Mounted Riflemen), Company G (also known as Bonham's Light Dragoons and Lipscomb's Troop), Company H (also known as Congaree Troops), and Company I (also known as the Edgefield Hussars or formerly known as Company A, Cavalry Battalion, Hampton Legion, and the Edgefield Dragoons)
- 3rd Battalion, South Carolina Cavalry, Company B (also known as the Congaree Rangers and Captain Frank Hampton's Company)
- 3rd Battalion, South Carolina Infantry (Lauren's) (James'), Company F (also known as the Harper Rifles)
- 3rd Battalion, South Carolina Light Artillery (Palmetto Battalion), Company B (also known as Waites's Light Battery, Captain John Waites's Company; and Columbia Flying Artillery), Company G (also known as the DeSaussure Light Artillery and the DePass Light Battery), and Company K (also known as Richardson's Company)
- 4th Regiment, South Carolina State Troops, Company A and Company G
- 4th Regiment, South Carolina State Troop Junior Reserves, Company D
- 5th Battalion, South Carolina Reserves (Brown's), Company A
- 5th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry , Company A
- 6th Regiment, South Carolina Cavalry (Aiken's Partisan Rangers) (1st Partisan Rangers), Company B, Company G, and Company H
- 7th Battalion, South Carolina Infantry (Nelson's) (Enfield Rifles), Company C, Company E, Company G, and Company H
- 7th Regiment, South Carolina Reserves (90 days 1862-63), Company B
- 7th Regiment, South Carolina Cavalry , Company D, Company H, and Company K
- 8th Regiment, South Carolina Reserves
- 9th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, Company B
- 12th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, Company D
- 15th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry , Company A
-20th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, Reorganized Company M
- 24th Regiment, South Carolina Infantry, Company G
- Garden's Company, South Carolina Light Aritillery (Palmetto Light Battery)
- Shiver's Company, South Caroline Local Defense Troops

Other Resources

  • Moore, John Hammond. Columbia and Richland County: a South Carolina Community, 1740-1990. (Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, c1993). 521 pages. Family papers, reminiscences, institutional histories, census returns, official and unofficial documents, files of local newspapers, personal recollections and casual conversations have all contributed to this history. Civil War pages 181-208. Book found at FHL 975.771 H2m and Other Libraries

Naturalization and Citizenship[edit | edit source]

  • United States. District Court. Naturalization records, Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina, 1907-1910, 1918. Salt Lake City, Utah: Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 1987-1989. 2 microfilm reels 35 mm. Declarations of intention v. 47 1907-1910, Index to naturalization records - Camp Jackson (alphabetically) v. 21 1918, Index to naturalization records - Camp Jackson (by petition numbers) v. 26 1918. This microfilm series can be found in the catalog and viewed at FamilySearch Centers and Affiliates.

Newspapers[edit | edit source]

  • Richland County Public Library offers an online obituary index for The State and the Palmetto Leader newspapers. The index is a work in progress. Additional years are added as they are completed. An online request form is available to request the full text of an obituary.

Historic Newspapers - Digitized

See Columbia newspapers for a list of newspapers digitized by the South Caroliniana Library. Available online for free through the Chronicling America website.[11]

Obituaries[edit | edit source]

1892-2000 Richland County, South Carolina, Obituary Index, 1892-2000. Online at: Ancestry($) : Look for more sources that help you with historical context such as photos.

1859-1877 Columbia, South Carolina Obituaries, 1859-1877. Online at: Ancestry ($): This covers 1859-1877 and court records were destroyed for Richland County.

Other Records[edit | edit source]

Periodicals[edit | edit source]

Tap into the minds of local experts. Editors of genealogical periodicals publish unique sources that researchers new to their area may not encounter. Periodicals at various levels (county, region, and state) may carry articles useful to research in this area. For more information and links, see South Carolina Periodicals.

  • Columbia Chronicle

Probate Records[edit | edit source]

Various types of records are created throughout the probate process of settling estates and property, usually after death. These may include, wills, bonds, petitions, accounts, inventories, administrations, orders, decrees, and distributions. For further information see probate records in South Carolina Probate Records.

Online Probate Indexes and Records

Probate records for Richland County may be found in the court of ordinary, the probate court, and the court of equity. Estate records for the probate court, 1787-1941, also available on microfilm through the Family History Library, with an index covering 1787-1950. FHL Film 24335 Also check miscellaneous estate records, 1799-1955. FHL Film 24406

Transcripts

School Records[edit | edit source]

Social Security Records[edit | edit source]

Tax Records[edit | edit source]

Tax-related records are kept by the offices of the county Assessor, Auditor, Sheriff, and Treasurer. Taxes were levied on real and personal property and can help establish ages, residences, and relationships. See South Carolina Taxation for online resources and suggestions.

  • South Carolina Department of Archives and History tax lists for Richland County.

Vital Records[edit | edit source]

Birth, marriage, and death records were not recorded by South Carolina until the 1900s, thus leaving a lack of vital records created by Civil authorities. See South Carolina Vital Records for online resources and suggestions.

Birth[edit | edit source]

State-wide birth registration did not begin until 1915. For records after 1915, see the South Carolina Vital Records page.

Marriage[edit | edit source]

In South Carolina, Probate Courts issued and still keep marriage licenses from 1 July 1911 to the present. Licenses were not required before 1911. In the 1700s, the Church of England parish churches were required to record all marriages - even if the couple were not members of the denomination. Statewide registration of marriages started in July, 1950. See South Carolina Vital Records for indexes and more information.

Marriages and Marriage Substitutes - Indexes and Records

  • 1838-1860 - Marriage and Death Notices from Columbia, South Carolina Newspapers, 1838-1860 by Brent Holcomb and Shelley Palmer [12]FHL Collection WorldCat, Digital version at Ancestry.com($) - abstracts
  • 1911 to Present - Marriage License Inquiry by Richland County Probate Court - online index
  • 1911-1952 - Richland County, South Carolina Registers, 1911-1952; Marriage Licenses, 1911-1922 [13]FHL Collection - records
  • There are several online marriage indexes containing miscellaneous marriage records found in some counties of South Carolina listed on the South Carolina Vital Records page.

Death[edit | edit source]

State-wide death registration began in 1915. For information and online records, see the South Carolina Vital Records page.

Deaths and Death Substitutes - Indexes and Records

Divorce[edit | edit source]

Research Facilities[edit | edit source]

Archives[edit | edit source]

Listed below are archives in Richland County. For state-wide library facilities, see South Carolina Archives and Libraries.

Family History Centers[edit | edit source]

Family History Center and Affiliate Library Locator map - search for local Family History Centers or Affiliate Libraries

  • Family History Centers provide one-on-one assistance, free access to center-only databases, and to premium genealogical websites.
  • FamilySearch Affiliate Libraries have access to most center-only databases, but may not always have full services normally provided by a family history center.

Local Centers and Affiliate Libraries

Libraries[edit | edit source]

Listed below are libraries in Richland County. For state-wide library facilities, see South Carolina Archives and Libraries.

South Caroliniana Library
910 Sumter St.
University of South Carolina
Columbia, S.C. 29208
Telephone for Main Office: (803) 777-3131
FAX South Caroliniana Library: (803) 777-5747
Email: sclref@mailbox.sc.edu with any questions regarding South Caroliniana Library and its holdings.

Main Library
1431 Assembly Street
Columbia, SC 29201
Telephone: (803) 799-9084
Hours: Monday to Thursday 9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m., Friday to Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Sunday 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

The Walker Local History Room, on the third level of the Richland County Public Library’s Main Library, contains genealogy and local history resources. It is is open during regular library hours and the collection emphasizes information about the Midlands area of South Carolina, including Richland, Lexington, Kershaw, Newberry, Fairfield, Orangeburg, Sumter and Calhoun counties.
The Walker Local History Room is also a FamilySearch affiliate.

The Richland County Public Library System serves several counties in the area. It has a presence on YouTube and Flickr. Branches are listed below. It has several online digital collections, including:

- an online obituary index and a Walker Local History Room digital collection.
- Online catalog
- The print collection does not circulate, but there are many resources available online. All of the local history photographs are available for viewing on Flickr. RCPL also maintains an online obituary index. Many of the oral histories are available to download through RCPL’s Overdrive. These resources are all available in the Digital Library.
Workshops demonstrating RCPL’s online resources for family history research are available several times a year. The Genealogy section in Research Tools includes links to South Carolina online resources and provides RCPL patrons with access to library-supported genealogy databases.

Blythewood Branch
218 McNulty Road
Blythewood, SC 29016
Telephone: (803) 691-9806
Hours: Monday to Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Friday to Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Cooper Branch
5317 North Trenholm Road
Columbia, SC 29206
Telephone: (803) 787-3462
Hours:Monday to Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday to Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Eastover Branch
608 Main Street
Eastover, SC 29044
Telephone: (803) 353-8584
Hours: Monday - Tuesday 9:00 a.m. to 800 p.m., Wednesday 9:00 a.m.to 6:00 p.m., Thursday 9:00 a.m.to 1:00 p.m., Friday to Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

North Main Branch 
5306 North Main Street
Columbia, SC 29203
Telephone: (803) 754-7734
Hours: Monday to- Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday to Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Northeast Regional
7490 Parklane Road,
Columbia, SC 29223
Telephone: (803) 736-6575
Hours: Monday to Thurs., 9 a.m. - 9 p.m., Friday to Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Sandhills Branch 
Summit Parkway
Columbia, SC 29229
Telephone: (803) 699-92301
Hours: Monday to Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday to Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Southeast Regional
7421 Garners Ferry Road
Columbia, SC 29209
Telephone: (803) 776-0855
Hours: Monday to Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 9:00 a.m.to 6:00 p.m.

St. Andrews Regional 
2916 Broad River Road
Columbia, SC 29210
Telephone: (803) 772-6675
Hours: Monday to Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday to Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

Wheatley Branch
931 Woodrow Street
Columbia, SC 29205
Telephone: (803) 799-5873
Hours: Monday, Wednedsay, Fririday, Saturday 9:00 a.m.to 6:00 p.m., Tuesday, Thursday 9:00 a.m.to 8:00 p.m.

Museums[edit | edit source]

Societies[edit | edit source]

Listed below are societies in Richland County. For state-wide genealogical societies, see South Carolina Societies.

Columbia Chapter SCGS
PO Box 24526
Columbia, SC 29224-4526
Website
Historic Columbia Foundation
1601 Richland Street
Columbia SC 29201-2633
Website

Websites[edit | edit source]

  • FamilySearch Catalog – The FamilySearch catalog contains descriptions and access information for all genealogical materials (including books, online materials, microfilm, microfiche, and publications) in their collection.  Use Historical Records to search for specific individuals in genealogical records.

Research Guides[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. South Carolina Historical Boundary Changes - list of all boundary changes by county provided by Newberry Library; accessed on 11 April 2021.
  2. South Carolina Historical Boundary Changes - list of all boundary changes by county provided by Newberry Library; accessed on 11 April 2021.
  3. Wikipedia contributors, "Richland, South Carolina," in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richland_County,_South_Carolina. accessed 15/07/2019
  4. Voice of Phillip Stalvey, resident of Myrtle Beach, S.C. (2011).
  5. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), Richland County, South Carolina. Page 611-615 At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002; Alice Eichholz, ed. Ancestry’s Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, Third ed. (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004), 607-608.
  6. South Carolina Historical Boundary Changes - list of all boundary changes by county provided by Newberry Library; accessed on 11 April 2021.
  7. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), South Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  8. Wikipedia contributors, "Richland County, South Carolina," in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richland_County,_South_Carolina, accessed 28 December 2019.
  9. Schweitzer, George K. , South Carolina Genealogical Research (Knoxville, Tennessee: s.p. 1985), 39-42, FHL book 975.7 D27s
  10. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), 847-61. (FHL Book 973 D27e 2002) WorldCat entry., and William E. Myer, Indian Trails of the Southeast. (Nashville, Tenn.: Blue and Gray Press, 1971), 12-14, and the book's pocket map "The Trail System of the Southeastern United States in the early Colonial Period" (1923). (FHL Book 970.1 M992i) WorldCat entry.
  11. Digital Collections, "Columbia Phoenix in Chronicling America," South Carolina Digital Newspaper Project, 20 Sep 2010.
  12. Holcomb, Brent H. and Shelley Palmer, Marriage and Death Notices from Columbia, South Carolina Newspapers, 1838-1860, [S.l.: s.n.], c1988.
  13. South Carolina, Probate Court (Richland County), Richland County, South Carolina Registers, 1911-1952; Marriage Licenses, 1911-1922, Salt Lake City, UT: Filmed by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 2004.
  14. Holcomb, Brent H. and Shelley Palmer, Marriage and Death Notices from Columbia, South Carolina Newspapers, 1838-1860, [S.l.: s.n.], c1988.
  15. Holcomb, Brent Howard, Record of Deaths in Columbia, South Carolina and Elsewhere as Recorded by John Glass, 1859-1877, [S.l.: s.n.], c1986.