FamilySearch Commences Indexing of Historic Toulouse France 1891 Census

August 26, 2014  - by 

FamilySearch.org—the world’s largest repository of genealogical records–has some exciting indexing projects of significant historic French records, including the 1891 Toulouse Census. It is looking for online volunteers who speak both French and English to help make these records easily searchable online. Go to the FamilySearch indexing home page to find out how to help.

There are four great French indexing projects of interest currently underway. These include; 1) the 1891 Toulouse census (13% indexed); 2) a portion of the parish records of the Coutance and Avranches Dioceses from 1796 to 1880 (69% indexed); 3) the French Protestant registers from 1564 to 1907 (99% indexed); and 4) the 1872 Toulouse Census (0% indexed).   The parish registers of the Dioceses of Quimper and Leon from 1772 to 1909 are completely indexed, and these names are therefore searchable on the FamilySearch site.

The Toulouse censuses are very important in French genealogy because of Toulouse’s location as a center of a vast population movement during the Industrial Revolution by bringing the people of the rural areas and other parts of Europe to the great cities of France to find a better life. The construction of the Matabiau Railroad Station in 1856 further enhanced this movement by connecting Toulouse with the other great cities of France, including Paris. The 1872 census is especially important because this is the only census that asked the where all the people in the city came from, thus giving researchers the information they need to trace their ancestors.

FamilySearch is constantly expanding its international indexing projects. Recently, FamilySearch held a world-wide indexing event with the goal of mobilizing 50,000 volunteer indexers in one 24-hour day. The project was a great success, engaging 66,500 online volunteers to help.

More than a billion records are now searchable online at FamilySearch.org by volunteers since 2006—and at no cost.

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