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{{Record_Search_article|CID=CID1443825|title=Wisconsin State Census, 1855|location=United States}}
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{{Record_Search_article|CID=CID1443825 |title=Wisconsin State Census, 1855|location=United States}} <br>
  
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== Record Description  ==
  
 +
Population schedules consisted of large sheets with rows and columns. The schedules are arranged by county, then by political subdivision. The arrangement of families on a schedule is normally in the order in which the enumerator visited the households.
  
 
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In 1855 the state legislature directed that a census be taken in June of that year and every 10 years thereafter. However, no census was taken in 1865. The completed forms were sent to the Secretary of State. The census covers approximately 90% of the population.&nbsp;  
[[Image:Wisconsin 1855 Census.jpg|thumb|center]]&nbsp;  
 
 
 
== Collection Time Period  ==
 
  
 
Wisconsin census were conducted from 1855-1905. This information pertains to censuses taken in the year 1855.&nbsp;  
 
Wisconsin census were conducted from 1855-1905. This information pertains to censuses taken in the year 1855.&nbsp;  
  
== Record History  ==
+
The state census of Wisconsin was taken in order to enumerate the population for representation purposes
  
In 1855 the state legislature directed that a census be taken in June of that year and every 10 years thereafter. However, no census was taken in 1865. The completed forms were sent to the Secretary of State.&nbsp;The census covers approximately 90% of the population.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
+
Censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified.  
  
=== Why This Record Was Created  ===
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For a list of records by localities currently published in this collection, select the [https://familysearch.org/search/image/index#uri=https%3A//api.familysearch.org/records/collection/1443825/waypoints Browse].
  
The state census of Wisconsin was taken in order to enumerate the population for representation purposes&nbsp;
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=== Citation for This Collection  ===
  
=== Record Reliability  ===
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The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Record collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.
  
Censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified.&nbsp;
+
{{Collection citation
 +
|text = <!--bibdescbegin-->Department of State. Wisconsin state census 1855. State Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin.<!--bibdescend-->}}
  
== Record Description  ==
+
[[Wisconsin 1855 State Census (FamilySearch Historical Records)#Citation_Example_for_a_Record_Found_in_This_Collection|Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.]]
  
Population schedules consisted of large sheets with rows and columns. The schedules are arranged by county, then by political subdivision. The arrangement of families on a schedule is normally in the order in which the enumerator visited the households.&nbsp;<br>
+
== Record Content  ==
  
=== Record&nbsp;Content  ===
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Key genealogical facts found in Wisconsin state censuses for the year 1855:
  
Key genealogical facts found in Wisconsin state censuses for the year 1855:
+
[[Image:Wisconsin 1855 Census.jpg|thumb|center]]
  
 
*Name of the head of the family  
 
*Name of the head of the family  
 
*Number of individuals in the household by sex and race  
 
*Number of individuals in the household by sex and race  
*Number of deaf and dumb, blind, insane, and foreign born&nbsp;
+
*Number of deaf and dumb, blind, insane, and foreign born
  
 
== How To Use The Record  ==
 
== How To Use The Record  ==
  
State census records are a good source to identify residence. Use this information to search for other record types. The census may identify persons for whom other records do not exist. <br>
+
Begin your search by finding your ancestors in the census index. Use the locator information in the index (such as page number or family number) to locate your ancestors in the census. Some on-line indexes, such as indexes to FamilySearch Historical Records, will take you directly to an image. Compare the information in the census to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to compare the information of more than one family or person to make this determination. Be aware that as with any index, transcription errors may occur.
 +
 
 +
When you have located your ancestor in the census, carefully evaluate each piece of information about them. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors.
 +
 
 +
For example:
 +
 
 +
*Birth places can tell you former residences and can help to establish a migration pattern for the family.
 +
*Use the race information to find records related to that ethnicity such as records of the Freedman’s Bureau or Indian censuses.
 +
 
 +
It is often helpful to extract the information on all families with the same surname in the same general area. If the surname is uncommon, it is likely that those living in the same area were related.
 +
 
 +
Be sure to extract all families before you look at other records. The relationships given will help you to organize family groups. The family groupings will help you identify related families when you discover additional information in other records.
 +
 
 +
Some other helpful tips to keep in mind are:
 +
 
 +
*Married family members may have lived nearby but in a separate household so you may want to search an entire town, neighboring towns, or even a county.
 +
*You may be able to identify an earlier generation if elderly parents were living with or close by a married child.
 +
*You may be able to identify a younger generation if a young married couple still lived with one of their sets of parents.
 +
*Additional searches may be needed to locate all members of a particular family in the census.
 +
 
 +
You should also be aware that the census may identify persons for whom other records do not exist.  
 +
 
 +
For a summary of this information see the wiki article: [[United States, How to Use the Records Summary (FamilySearch Historical Records)|United States, How to Use the Records Summary (FamilySearch Historical Records)]].
  
 
== Related Websites  ==
 
== Related Websites  ==
  
'''This section of the article is incomplete. You can help FamilySearch Wiki by supplying links to related websites here. '''<br>
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*[http://www.usgwcensus.org/states/wisconsin/ Wisconsin Census Project]
 +
*[http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/oneida/ Oneida First Christian Party Census]
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*[http://www.census-online.com/links/WI/ Wisconsin Census Online Index]
 +
 
 +
== Related Wiki Articles  ==
 +
 
 +
*[[Wisconsin|Wisconsin]]
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*[[Wisconsin Census]]
  
== Related Wiki Articles<br> ==
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== Contributions to This Article  ==
  
[https://wiki.familysearch.org/en/Wisconsin_Census Wisconsin Census]
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{{Contributor invite}}
  
== Sources of&nbsp;This Collection <br> ==
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== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections  ==
  
"Wisconsin 1855 State Census," database, FamilySearch; (http://familysearch.org), from Wisconsin Department of State. Digital images of originals housed in the Wisconsin State Historical Society at Madison. FHL microfilm,&nbsp;4 reels. Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
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When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.  
  
==== '''How To Cite Your Sources'''  ====
+
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article [[Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].
  
''An example of citing these records is: Wisconsin. Department of State. Wisconsin&nbsp;State Census, 1855. Census page. From FamilySearch Internet (www.familysearch.org), April 23, 2010. Otto Smith, Two Rivers, Manitowoc,&nbsp;Wisconsin, image number 00023.''
+
=== Citation Example for a Record Found in This Collection  ===
  
''Instructions for citing this source can be found at:&nbsp;[[How to Cite FamilySearch Collections|How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]]&nbsp;''<br>
+
"Wisconsin State Census, 1855." index and images, ''FamilySearch''(https://www.familysearch.org: accessed 13 April 2011). &nbsp;John B. Smith; citing Census Records, FHL microfilm 1,032,686; Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin.
  
 
[[Category:Wisconsin|Census]]
 
[[Category:Wisconsin|Census]]

Revision as of 03:21, 24 January 2013

FamilySearch Record Search This article describes a collection of historical records available at FamilySearch.org.
Access the records: Wisconsin State Census, 1855 .
CID1443825
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Record Description

Population schedules consisted of large sheets with rows and columns. The schedules are arranged by county, then by political subdivision. The arrangement of families on a schedule is normally in the order in which the enumerator visited the households.

In 1855 the state legislature directed that a census be taken in June of that year and every 10 years thereafter. However, no census was taken in 1865. The completed forms were sent to the Secretary of State. The census covers approximately 90% of the population. 

Wisconsin census were conducted from 1855-1905. This information pertains to censuses taken in the year 1855. 

The state census of Wisconsin was taken in order to enumerate the population for representation purposes

Censuses are usually reliable, depending on the knowledge of the informant and the care of the census enumerator. Information may have been given to a census taker by any member of the family or by a neighbor. Some information may have been incorrect or deliberately falsified.

For a list of records by localities currently published in this collection, select the Browse.

Citation for This Collection

The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Record collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher and archive for the original records.

Department of State. Wisconsin state census 1855. State Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin.

Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.

Record Content

Key genealogical facts found in Wisconsin state censuses for the year 1855:

Wisconsin 1855 Census.jpg
  • Name of the head of the family
  • Number of individuals in the household by sex and race
  • Number of deaf and dumb, blind, insane, and foreign born

How To Use The Record

Begin your search by finding your ancestors in the census index. Use the locator information in the index (such as page number or family number) to locate your ancestors in the census. Some on-line indexes, such as indexes to FamilySearch Historical Records, will take you directly to an image. Compare the information in the census to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to compare the information of more than one family or person to make this determination. Be aware that as with any index, transcription errors may occur.

When you have located your ancestor in the census, carefully evaluate each piece of information about them. These pieces of information may give you new biographical details that can lead you to other records about your ancestors.

For example:

  • Birth places can tell you former residences and can help to establish a migration pattern for the family.
  • Use the race information to find records related to that ethnicity such as records of the Freedman’s Bureau or Indian censuses.

It is often helpful to extract the information on all families with the same surname in the same general area. If the surname is uncommon, it is likely that those living in the same area were related.

Be sure to extract all families before you look at other records. The relationships given will help you to organize family groups. The family groupings will help you identify related families when you discover additional information in other records.

Some other helpful tips to keep in mind are:

  • Married family members may have lived nearby but in a separate household so you may want to search an entire town, neighboring towns, or even a county.
  • You may be able to identify an earlier generation if elderly parents were living with or close by a married child.
  • You may be able to identify a younger generation if a young married couple still lived with one of their sets of parents.
  • Additional searches may be needed to locate all members of a particular family in the census.

You should also be aware that the census may identify persons for whom other records do not exist.

For a summary of this information see the wiki article: United States, How to Use the Records Summary (FamilySearch Historical Records).

Related Websites

Related Wiki Articles

Contributions to This Article

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. We are looking for additional information that will help readers understand the topic and better use the available records. We also need translations for collection titles and images in articles about records written in languages other than English. For specific needs, please visit WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Please follow these guidelines as you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide.


Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections

When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.

A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections.

Citation Example for a Record Found in This Collection

"Wisconsin State Census, 1855." index and images, FamilySearch(https://www.familysearch.org: accessed 13 April 2011).  John B. Smith; citing Census Records, FHL microfilm 1,032,686; Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin.