Difference between revisions of "Upper Bavaria District, Bavaria Genealogy"

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====Lutheran Parish Addresses====
 
====Lutheran Parish Addresses====
*[http://www.ekiba.de/html/content/adressen_und_kontakt176.html?& '''Click here'''] for a searchable address list of Lutheran parishes.<br>
+
*[https://www.bayern-evangelisch.de/ '''Click here'''] for a searchable address list of Lutheran parishes.<br>
  
 
====Catholic Parish Addresses by Diocese====
 
====Catholic Parish Addresses by Diocese====

Revision as of 06:25, 19 November 2017

Germany Genealogy
Bavaria, Germany Genealogy
Upper Bavaria or Oberbayern

How to Find Birth, Marriage, and Death Records for Upper Bavaria (Oberbayern) District, Bavaria

Most of your genealogical research for Bavaria will be in three main record types: civil registration, church records, and, when available, a compiled town genealogy ("'Ortssippenbuch" or "Ortsfamilienbuch" in German). This article will teach you how to use these records

  • on digital databases,
  • as microfilms,
  • or by writing for them.

Maps and Gazetteers

Town Compilation of Records (Ortssippenbuch or Ortsfamilienbuch )

See class Online Ortsfamilienbücher at Genealogy.net.

  • An Ortssippenbuch (town lineage book) or Ortsfamilienbuch (town family book) generally includes birth, marriage, and death data for all persons found in the local records during a specified time period, compiled into families. If one is available, it can act as an index or guide to finding the original records. However, they may contain errors, so it is best to verify their information in original records.
  • Sources may include the local parish registers, civil registration records, court and land records, and sometimes published material. In the printed book, this information is then arranged in a standardized format, usually alphabetically by surname and chronologically by marriage date.

Finding an OFB

Civil Registration (Standesamtsregister, Zivilstandsregister, or Personenstandsregister)

Civil registers are government-kept records of births, marriages, and deaths. In Bavaria, civil registry offices were introduced on 1 January 1876. In the regions to the west of the Rhine, however, they were briefly keeping records in the Napoleonic era (1811-1815). In addition, a collection of marriage proclamations and residency records cover approximately 1785-1927.

Civil registers can now be found in the local Standesamt, which is either in the registry office or town hall. Copies of civil registers have to be sent to the district registry offices. Records before 110 years ago for birth registers, 80 years ago for marriage registers, 30 years ago for death registers are preserved with the state archives.

1. Microfilm Copies of Civil Registration From FamilySearch

A few, not many, civil registration records will be in the microfilm collection of the Family History Library. The number should increase gradually. These microfilms may be available for viewing at Family History Centers around the world. To find a microfilm:

a. Click on the records of Bayern, Germany.
b. Click on Places within Bayern, Germany and a list of towns will appear.
c. Click on your town. If the town or village is not listed, find the town in Meyer's Gazetteer. See where the Standesamt (StdA.) was. It may have been in different place, because of the size of the town.
d. Click on the "Civil registration" topic, if available. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
e. Choose the correct record type and time period for your ancestor. "Geburten" are births. Heiraten are marriages. "Verstorbene" are deaths.
f. Some combination of these icons will appear at the far right of the microfilm listed for the record. FHL icons.png. The magnifying glass indicates that the microfilm is indexed. Clicking on the magnifying glass will take you to the index. Clicking on the camera will take you to an online digital copy of the microfilm.

Bavaria Marriage Proclamation and Residency Records

Other important microfilmed records for Bavaria are the Bavaria Marriage Proclamation and Residency Records. A a list for parishes that have these records available is available (with microfilm numbers).

  • The Verehelichung and Heiratsbelege (marriage proclamation records) contain documents which were presented to authorities for banns before a marriage could take place. Although the actual marriage date is usually not included in these records, other important genealogical information is often recorded, such as birth documentation, military service, etc.
  • Another document group currently being microfilmed is the Ansässigmachungsakten (residency records). These were the papers presented in order to take up residency. Since change in residency was often connected with marriage, these documents are closely linked to the Verehelichung or marriage proclamation/intention files. The records cover the years approximately for 1785-1927, varying by parish.


For more detail on the types of information contained in the records, which can be extensive, see Bavaria Marriage Proclamation and Residency Records.

2. Writing for Civil Registration Certificates

Civil registration records for Germany can be obtained by writing to the local civil registry (Standesamt) or the district archives. Records may have been lost at one location of the other, so you might end up checking both. The first office you contact might choose to forward your request to the other location if necessary. Write to the district archives if you wish to inquire about more than one town--for example, if you think a couple were married at either the groom's hometown or the bride's, and you want both places searched.

Determine the Standesamt (Civil Registry Office) Location

Research your town name in MeyersGaz.org to find the location of the Standesamt. It is indicated by the abbreviation "StdA". However, some of the offices were merged in 1970's, so the record location might be different than that listed in MeyersGaz.

  • For a municipality:
  • To find the current Standesamt, go to the German Wikipedia, and enter the name of the town in the search box. An article about the town will start with a first line such as: "Besse with about 3200 inhabitants is the largest district of the municipality Edermünde in Hessian Schwalm-Eder-Kreis ." It is probable that the Standesamt is now located in the municipality (in this example Edermünde).
  • Email the municipality to verify that the civil registry for your town is there. From the town article, click on the name of the municipality that links to that article. There will usually be an infobox on the page that lists the address and the website of the municipality. From the website, look for Kontakt (Contact) information with an email address.
  • For a town:
  • Follow the same instructions as for a municipality. However, in this case, the first line will read, for example: "Borken is a town in the Schwalm-Eder-Kreis with about 13,000 residents.
  • The infobox with the website will appear directly on a town page.

Local Standesamt Address

Using this address as guide, replace the information in parentheses:

An das Standesamt
(Insert street address, if known.)
(Postal Code) (Name of Locality)
GERMANY

Archive Address

Here is the address for the district archive, should you decide to write there instead of or in addition to the local Standesamt.

Munich (for Upper Bavaria/Oberbayern)
Staatsarchiv Munich
Schöfeldstr. 5, 80539 München Germany (P.O. Box) Postfach 221 152
80501 Munich
Germany
Tel 089 / 28638-525
Internet: Website of the State Archives

How to Write the Letter

Detailed instruction for what to include in the letter, plus German translations of the questions and sentences most frequently used are in the Germany Letter Writing Guide.

Church Records (Kirchenbuch or Kirchenbuchduplikate)

See Germany Church Records to learn more.

  • Entries for baptisms/christenings, marriages, and burials in the local church records are the main source to use prior to 1876, when civil registration began. Often two and sometimes three generations are indicated in the registers, with personal information on the family. Also after 1876, these records might be intact when the civil registers were destroyed, or vice versa. In addition, either the church records and civil records might contain information not it the other record.
  • You should try to determine whether your ancestors were Catholic or Lutheran (Evangelical).
  • You should try to determine where the parish church was that held jurisdiction over your town. Find the town in Meyer's Gazetteer. Click on the "Ecclesiastical" link for information in the menu bar. This will tell you whether the town had its own parish church and give you the names of several nearby parish churches and their distance.

1. Online Church Records

Many records for the Lutheran (Evangelical) church are digitized and available online through Archion.

2. Microfilm Copies of Church Records Searched at a Family History Center

First, try to find church records in the microfilm collection of the Family History Library. These microfilms may be available for viewing at Family History Centers around the world. To find a microfilm:

a. Click on the records of Bayern, Germany.
b. Click on Places within Bayern, Germany and a list of towns will appear.
c. Click on your town if it appears, or the location which you believe was the parish which served your town or village.
d. Click on the "Church records" topic. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
e. Choose the correct record type and time period for your ancestor. "Geburten" are births. Taufen are christenings/baptisms. Heiraten are marriages. "Toten" are deaths.
f. Some combination of these icons will appear at the far right of the microfilm listed for the record. FHL icons.png. The magnifying glass indicates that the microfilm is indexed. Clicking on the magnifying glass will take you to the index. Clicking on the camera will take you to an online digital copy of the microfilm.

3. Writing to an Priest for Church Records

  • Baptism, marriage, and death records may be searched by contacting the local Catholic or Lutheran church or the Catholic diocese archives.

Lutheran Parish Addresses

  • Click here for a searchable address list of Lutheran parishes.

Catholic Parish Addresses by Diocese

Writing to a Local Parish

Write a brief request in German to the proper church using this address as a guide, replacing the information in parentheses:

For a Protestant Parish:

An das evangelische Pfarramt
(Insert street address, if known.)
(Postal Code) (Name of Locality)
GERMANY

For a Catholic Parish:

An das katholische Pfarramt
(Insert street address, if known.)
(Postal Code) (Name of Locality)
GERMANY


How to write a letter: Detailed instruction for what to include in the letter, plus German translations of the questions and sentences most frequently used are in the Germany Letter Writing Guide.

4. Research at Church Archives

Protestant

Landeskirchliches Archiv der Evangelisch-Lutherischen Kirche in Bayern
Veilhofstraße 8
90489 Nürnberg-Wöhrd
Germany

Phone: +49 911 58869- 0
Fax: +49 911 58869-69
Website:http://www.archiv-elkb.de/familienforschung


The LAELKB saves church books (or churches) from more than a third of the parishioners of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, as well as some communities of the Reformed Church in Bavaria. The rest of the municipalities keep this information in their own possession. You can find out which of the church books you need to be at our office, or you can consult the church book overview page. In order to preserve the originals, the church books are available only in the form of digital copies. You must visit yourself or hire a researcher.


Catholic

  • You can visit these archives yourself to research the records. Privacy rules apply to birth records more recent than 120 years, marriage records 80 years, and death records 30 years. A day fee of about EU 7.00 is charged to use the records. Call in advance to make reservations.
  • Some archives have search services available. Others will refer you to a list of private researchers to hire. Researchers can be found also through Google.



Archiv des Erzbistums München und Freising - for most of Oberbayern
Karmeliterstrasse 1
D-80333 München
Germany
Phone: 089 - 2137 1346
Fax: 089 - 2137 1702
E-mail: Archiv@ordinariat-muenchen.de

Reading the Records

  • It's easier than you think! You do not have to be fluent in French and German to use these records, as there is only a limited vocabulary used in them. By learning a few key phrases, you will be able to read them adequately. Here are some resources for learning to read German records.
German Genealogical Word List
German Handwriting
  • These video webinars will teach you to read German handwriting:
  • Also online interactive slideshow lessons are available to help you learn to read these records:

This converter will show you how any phrase or name might look in German script:

  • Kurrentschrift Converter (enter German genealogical word, click on "convert", view your word in Kurrentschrift (Gothic handwriting)

Latin Records

Records of the Catholic church will usually be written in Latin:

Search Strategy

  • Search for the relative or ancestor you selected. When you find his birth record, search for the births of his brothers and sisters.
  • Next, search for the marriage of his parents. The marriage record will have information that will often help you find the birth records of the parents.
  • You can estimate the ages of the parents and determine a birth year to search for their birth records.
  • Search the death registers for all known family members.
  • Repeat this process for both the father and the mother, starting with their birth records, then their siblings' births, then their parents' marriages, and so on.
  • If earlier generations (parents, grandparents, etc.) do not appear in the records, search neighboring parishes.