Difference between revisions of "Oklahoma Probate Records"

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[[Portal:United States Probate|Portal:United States Probate]]>[[Oklahoma|Oklahoma]]  
 
[[Portal:United States Probate|Portal:United States Probate]]>[[Oklahoma|Oklahoma]]  
  
== Record Synopsis ==
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== Record Synopsis ==
  
 
Probate is the “court procedure by which a will is proved to be valid or invalid” and encompasses “all matters and proceedings pertaining to the administration of estates, guardianships, etc.”<ref>Henry Campbell Black, ''Black's Law Dictionary,'' 5th ed. (St. Paul, Minnesota: West Publishing Co., 1979), 1081, "probate."</ref> Various types of records are created throughout the probate process. These may include, wills, bonds, petitions, accounts, inventories, administrations, orders, decrees, and distributions. These documents are extremely valuable to genealogists and should not be neglected. In many instances, they are the only known source of relevant information such as the decedent’s date of death, names of his or her spouse, children, parents, siblings, in-laws, neighbors, associates, relatives, and their places of residence. They may also include information about adoption or guardianship of minor children and dependents.  
 
Probate is the “court procedure by which a will is proved to be valid or invalid” and encompasses “all matters and proceedings pertaining to the administration of estates, guardianships, etc.”<ref>Henry Campbell Black, ''Black's Law Dictionary,'' 5th ed. (St. Paul, Minnesota: West Publishing Co., 1979), 1081, "probate."</ref> Various types of records are created throughout the probate process. These may include, wills, bonds, petitions, accounts, inventories, administrations, orders, decrees, and distributions. These documents are extremely valuable to genealogists and should not be neglected. In many instances, they are the only known source of relevant information such as the decedent’s date of death, names of his or her spouse, children, parents, siblings, in-laws, neighbors, associates, relatives, and their places of residence. They may also include information about adoption or guardianship of minor children and dependents.  
  
Explore more about the [[United States Probate Process|probate process]], [[United States Probate Limitations|limitations of probate records]], [[Analyzing United States Probate Records|analyzing probate records]], a [[Glossary of United States Probate Terms|glossary]] of probate terms, [[United States Probate Wills|wills]], and [http://wiki.familysearch.org/en/United_States_Probate_Records United States Probate Records].<br>
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Explore more about the [[United States Probate Process|probate process]], [[United States Probate Limitations|limitations of probate records]], [[Analyzing United States Probate Records|analyzing probate records]], a [[Glossary of United States Probate Terms|glossary]] of probate terms, [[United States Probate Wills|wills]], and [http://wiki.familysearch.org/en/United_States_Probate_Records United States Probate Records].<br>  
  
 
== <br>History  ==
 
== <br>History  ==
  
Prior to statehood (1907), Oklahoma probate records were kept by the U.S. district courts. The probate records are now under the jurisdiction of probate or county courts. The files include wills, dockets, administrator's records, guardianship records, inventories, appraisements, sales records, minutes, and journals.  
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Prior to statehood (1907), Oklahoma probate records were kept by the U.S. district courts. The probate records are now under the jurisdiction of probate or county courts. The files include wills, dockets, administrator's records, guardianship records, inventories, appraisements, sales records, minutes, and journals. <span id="fck_dom_range_temp_1333586792684_457" />
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Variations existed within counties as probate jurisdictions and county boundaries changed over the years. <br>
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== Searching Probate Records ==
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It is usually best to start a probate search at the county level. Links to county pages appear below. Additional resources for&nbsp;Oklahoma probates may be found in the [http://www.familysearch.org/search/search/index/catalog-search#searchType=catalog&amp;filtered=true&amp;catSearchType=subject_id&amp;searchCriteria=432318 Illinois-Probate] topic page of the Family History Library catalog (FHLC). Copies of records on FHL microfilm and microfiche can be ordered for viewing at [http://www.familysearch.org/locations FamilySearch Centers]. Also find&nbsp;Oklahoma Probate resources available at [http://www.worldcat.org/search?q=su%3Aillinois+probate+records&amp;qt=results_page many libraries (WorldCat)]. Explore how to search [[Worldcat Online Catalog|WorldCat]] and the [[Introduction to the Family History Library Catalog|FHLC]].&lt;br&gt;
  
 
== Availability  ==
 
== Availability  ==
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*[http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgs/records.htm http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgs/records.htm]
 
*[http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgs/records.htm http://www.rootsweb.com/~okgs/records.htm]
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== State Statures ==
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Understanding the&nbsp;Oklahooma probate laws and how they changed over time can help us learn how the estate was administered, taxed, and distributed and might help to solve difficult genealogical problems.
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Online digital versions of state statutes can often be found by conducting a search engine search for the term, "Oklahoma statutes." The following are examples of books related to&nbsp;Oklahoma probate laws:
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== Published Materials ==
  
 
== References  ==
 
== References  ==

Revision as of 00:53, 5 April 2012

Portal:United States Probate>Oklahoma

Record Synopsis

Probate is the “court procedure by which a will is proved to be valid or invalid” and encompasses “all matters and proceedings pertaining to the administration of estates, guardianships, etc.”<ref>Henry Campbell Black, Black's Law Dictionary, 5th ed. (St. Paul, Minnesota: West Publishing Co., 1979), 1081, "probate."</ref> Various types of records are created throughout the probate process. These may include, wills, bonds, petitions, accounts, inventories, administrations, orders, decrees, and distributions. These documents are extremely valuable to genealogists and should not be neglected. In many instances, they are the only known source of relevant information such as the decedent’s date of death, names of his or her spouse, children, parents, siblings, in-laws, neighbors, associates, relatives, and their places of residence. They may also include information about adoption or guardianship of minor children and dependents.

Explore more about the probate process, limitations of probate records,&nbsp;analyzing probate records, a glossary of probate terms, wills, and United States Probate Records.<br>


History

Prior to statehood (1907), Oklahoma probate records were kept by the U.S. district courts. The probate records are now under the jurisdiction of probate or county courts. The files include wills, dockets, administrator's records, guardianship records, inventories, appraisements, sales records, minutes, and journals.

Variations existed within counties as probate jurisdictions and county boundaries changed over the years.

Searching Probate Records

It is usually best to start a probate search at the county level. Links to county pages appear below. Additional resources for Oklahoma probates may be found in the Illinois-Probate topic page of the Family History Library catalog (FHLC). Copies of records on FHL microfilm and microfiche can be ordered for viewing at FamilySearch Centers. Also find Oklahoma Probate resources available at many libraries (WorldCat). Explore how to search WorldCat and the FHLC.<br>

Availability

You may obtain copies of the records by contacting the clerk's office in each county.  Many Indian probate records are at the National Archives—Central Plains Region. The Family History Library has copies of probate records from some counties.

For information on the names of non-natives, Native Americans, and “freedmen” (free blacks) who filed probate papers in the U.S. Federal Court, Northern District, Indian Territory, see:

  •  Opha Jewell Wever and Rosalie Wagner, Probate Records, 1892-1908, Northern District Cherokee Nation. 2 vols. Vinita, Oklahoma: Northeast Oklahoma Genealogical Society, 1982-1983.

Web Sites

State Statures

Understanding the Oklahooma probate laws and how they changed over time can help us learn how the estate was administered, taxed, and distributed and might help to solve difficult genealogical problems.

Online digital versions of state statutes can often be found by conducting a search engine search for the term, "Oklahoma statutes." The following are examples of books related to Oklahoma probate laws:


Published Materials

References

Oklahoma Research Outline. Salt Lake City, Utah: Intellectual Reserve, Inc., Family History Department, 1998, 2001.

NOTE: All of the information from the original research outline has been imported into the FamilySearch Wiki and is being updated as time permits.