Difference between revisions of "Newton Solney, Derbyshire Genealogy"

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[[England|England]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Derbyshire]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Derbyshire Parishes]][[Image:St Marys Newton Solney Derbyshire.JPG|thumb|right|St Marys Newton Solney Derbyshire.JPG]] <br>  
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[[England|England]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Derbyshire]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Derbyshire Parishes]][[Image:St Marys Newton Solney Derbyshire.JPG|thumb|right]] <br>  
  
 
== Parish History  ==
 
== Parish History  ==
  
Newton Solney is an Ancient Parish.<br>NEWTON-SOLNEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Burton, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 2¼ miles (N. E.) from Burton; containing 311 inhabitants. The manor was held at an early period, under the earls of Chester, by the ancient equestrian family of Solney, whose coheiress married into the Longford family, of whom the property was purchased by the Leighs, about the reign of Henry VIII. The heiress of the Leighs brought it to the Everys; and about 1795 Abraham Hoskins, Esq., purchased the principal estate. The parish is bounded on the west by the river Trent, and comprises 1401 acres, of rich strong land: on the Earl of Chesterfield's property are 120 acres of wood and plantations. The village is pleasant and well built; and there are several good mansions in the parish. On a commanding eminence is a large castellated building, called Hoskins' Folly. The living is a donative; net income, £20; patron and impropriator, Sir Henry Every, Bart. The church consists of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a low tower and short spire.From: 'Newton-Rigny - Newton, Wood', ''[[A Topographical Dictionary of England]]'' (1848), pp. 413-415. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51179 Date accessed: 09 March 2011.
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The castellated folly referred to above as Hoskins Folly became known as "Bladon Castle". On the summit of Bladon Hill in 1795 the Local High Bailiff built his folly, designed by leading architect Sir Jeffrey Wyatville, which looked&nbsp; like a castle with pointer armoury windows and full battlements but was in fact, no more than a single long wall, rather like a film set.  
 
The castellated folly referred to above as Hoskins Folly became known as "Bladon Castle". On the summit of Bladon Hill in 1795 the Local High Bailiff built his folly, designed by leading architect Sir Jeffrey Wyatville, which looked&nbsp; like a castle with pointer armoury windows and full battlements but was in fact, no more than a single long wall, rather like a film set.  

Revision as of 20:31, 13 May 2013

England Gotoarrow.png Derbyshire Gotoarrow.png Derbyshire Parishes
St Marys Newton Solney Derbyshire.JPG

Parish History

The castellated folly referred to above as Hoskins Folly became known as "Bladon Castle". On the summit of Bladon Hill in 1795 the Local High Bailiff built his folly, designed by leading architect Sir Jeffrey Wyatville, which looked  like a castle with pointer armoury windows and full battlements but was in fact, no more than a single long wall, rather like a film set.

In the climate of the Napoleanic war in mainland Europe, England was suffering hardship and was under serious threat of being invaded by Napolean’s Grande Armee. Hoskins had completely under-estimated how antagonistic his fake ‘castle’ would be and there was absolute upcry. In order to defuse this rooms were added and family members moved in to try to overcome criticism (1801-2).

The building subsequently passed into the ownership of John Gretton of the successful Bass Ratcliff and Gretton brewery and with improvements became a comfortable country house in the Newton Park estate lands.

The War Office requisitioned Bladon Castle during the Second World War following which, it was purchased by Air Chief Marshall Sir Ralph Cochrane who most famously, led the dam busters raid and Berlin airlift and who became Managing Director of Atlantic Shipbuilding Co. (1953 – 56), Rolls Royce Ltd. (1956 – 61) and Chairman of RJM Exports Ltd. (1962).

Resources

Civil Registration

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Staffordshire BMD includes registered births for the Burton upon Trent Registration District . http://www.staffordshirebmd.org.uk/cgi/birthind.cgi?county=staffordshire The registration district prior to 1937 included this parish. From 1937 onwards the Repton district was responsible. Registers are now held at
The Register Office, Royal Oak House, Market Place, Derby, DE1 3AR.
Tel: 01332 256526/35/36. Fax: 01332 256525.
E-mail: registeroffice@derby.gov.uk

Church records

Include here information for parish registers, Bishop’s Transcripts and other types of church records, such as parish chest records. Add the contact information for the office holding the original records. Add links to the Family History Library Catalog showing the film numbers in their collection

Census records

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library.


1543 Subsidy

Poor Law Unions

Burton upon Trent Poor Law Union,Staffordshire

Probate records

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Derbyshire Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Maps and Gazetteers

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Web sites

Bladon Castle is a Grade II listed building http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-82869-bladon-castle-newton-solney