Difference between revisions of "New Mexico Water Records"

From FamilySearch Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
(Introduction: Formatting)
(History: Added link)
Line 9: Line 9:
  
 
===History===
 
===History===
 +
See the following links:
 +
*[http://online.nmartmuseum.org/nmhistory/people-places-and-politics/water/history-water.html History: The Politics of Water]
  
 
===Importance of Water Records===
 
===Importance of Water Records===

Revision as of 04:35, 15 June 2014

United States Gotoarrow.png United States Water Records Gotoarrow.png New Mexico Gotoarrow.png New Mexico Water Records

Introduction

The average rainfall in New Mexico varies considerably depending on the altitude and other geographic factors. Most of the state receives 8 inches or less with the mountain regions receiving more. Because of the overall scarcity of water, it is considered the state's most vital resource. All water in the state, both surface and ground water, belong to the public and are subject to the Doctrine of Prior Appropriation. The Doctrine of Prior Appropriation is a carry-over from the Spanish Civil Law through Mexico. The Doctrine of Prior Appropriation states that the first user (appropriator) in time has the right to take and use water; and that right continues as against subsequent users as long as the appropriator puts the water to beneficial use.[1]

The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer maintains the Water Rights Lookup. The listing is not yet complete by may be useful in tracking individual rights.

History

See the following links:

Importance of Water Records

Finding Water Records

References

  1. DuMars, Charles T., New Mexico Water Law: An Overview and Discussion of Current Issues, University of New Mexico Law School.