Difference between revisions of "National Orphan Train Complex"

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Orphan train research helps find foster children between 1853 and 1930 who rode trains from [[New York City, New York|New York City]], [[Boston, Massachusetts|Boston]], or [[Chicago, Illinois|Chicago]] to new homes in other states or Canada. The genealogy of many of these 200,000 orphaned, abandoned, or homeless children can often be traced back to the [[Children's Aid Society]], or the [[New York Foundling Hospital]], among others.[[Image:{{NOTCopen}}]] <br><br>  
+
<br> Orphan train research helps find foster children between 1853 and 1930 who rode trains from [[New York City, New York|New York City]], [[Boston, Massachusetts|Boston]], or [[Chicago, Illinois|Chicago]] to new homes in other states or Canada. The genealogy of many of these 200,000 orphaned, abandoned, or homeless children can often be traced back to the [[Children's Aid Society]], or the [[New York Foundling Hospital]], among others.[[Image:{{NOTCopen}}]] <br><br>  
  
 
=== Contact Information  ===
 
=== Contact Information  ===
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*[http://www.orphantraindepot.com/index.html National Orphan Train Complex] Internet site: history, rider stories, events, news, rider registry, research, FAQs, educational material, and national speakers bureau.<br>  
 
*[http://www.orphantraindepot.com/index.html National Orphan Train Complex] Internet site: history, rider stories, events, news, rider registry, research, FAQs, educational material, and national speakers bureau.<br>  
 
*[http://www.orphantraindepot.com/Resources.html Orphan train research facilities] addresses and links in New York, New England, and Nebraska. <br>  
 
*[http://www.orphantraindepot.com/Resources.html Orphan train research facilities] addresses and links in New York, New England, and Nebraska. <br>  
*[http://www.orphantraindepot.com/StateContacts.html State orphan train groups] in AR, CO, IL, IN, IA, LA, MN, MO, NY, TX, and, WI. <br>
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*[http://www.orphantraindepot.com/StateContacts.html State orphan train groups] in AR, CO, IL, IN, IA, LA, MN, MO, NY, TX, and, WI. <br><br>
  
 
=== Collection Description  ===
 
=== Collection Description  ===
  
 
The National Orphan Train Museum and Research Center (a.k.a. Complex) collect, preserve, interpret, and disseminate knowledge about the orphan trains, the children and the agents who rode them.<ref name="Home">[http://www.orphantraindepot.com/index.html NOTC Home] at ''National Orphan Train Complex, Inc.'' (accessed 26 September 2012).</ref> This includes the history of the orphan train movement, and the stories of the children, photos, artifacts, and an archival collection. Also, they maintain a rider registry, a speakers' bureau, and the organization's online news.  
 
The National Orphan Train Museum and Research Center (a.k.a. Complex) collect, preserve, interpret, and disseminate knowledge about the orphan trains, the children and the agents who rode them.<ref name="Home">[http://www.orphantraindepot.com/index.html NOTC Home] at ''National Orphan Train Complex, Inc.'' (accessed 26 September 2012).</ref> This includes the history of the orphan train movement, and the stories of the children, photos, artifacts, and an archival collection. Also, they maintain a rider registry, a speakers' bureau, and the organization's online news.  
 +
 +
NOTC has 66 volumes of orphan train rider records of the American Female Guarding Society (AFGS), photos, about 20,000 rider records, 9,700 names in computer databases, and Internet access to Ancestry.com.<ref>Amanda Wahlmeier, Orphan Train Research Center curator, orphantraindepot@gmail.com, 28 September 2012, e-mail to David Dilts, DiltsGD@familysearch.org.</ref>
  
 
=== Tips  ===
 
=== Tips  ===
  
Admission: $5.00 Adults; &nbsp;$3.00 Children under 12; &nbsp;$4.00 Group rate for 10 or more people.<ref name="General" /> <br>  
+
*Please contact Amanda Wahlmeier, curator, <u>before</u> visiting so she can see if NOTC archives have records of your person.<br>
 +
*NOTC charges $20 for their research resources. <br>
 +
*General admission: $5.00 Adults; &nbsp;$3.00 Children under 12; &nbsp;$4.00 Group rate for 10 or more people.<ref name="General" /> <br><br>
  
 
=== Alternate Repositories  ===
 
=== Alternate Repositories  ===
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'''''Overlapping Collections'''''<br>  
 
'''''Overlapping Collections'''''<br>  
  
 +
*[[Children's Aid Society]], NYC, archives searches ($) for adoptions, and orphan train riders.<br>
 +
*[[New York Foundling Hospital]], can do records research for close relatives only of placed-out children.<br>
 
*[[National Archives Central Plains Region (Kansas City)]], censuses, military, pensions, naturalizations, photos, for IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, ND, SD; Internet access to Ancestry, Heritage Quest, and Footnote.<br>  
 
*[[National Archives Central Plains Region (Kansas City)]], censuses, military, pensions, naturalizations, photos, for IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, ND, SD; Internet access to Ancestry, Heritage Quest, and Footnote.<br>  
*[http://www.archives.gov/research/land/ National Archives I], Washington, DC has [[Homestead Records|homestead applications]] for Kansas.<br>  
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*[http://www.archives.gov/research/land/ National Archives I], Washington, DC has [[Homestead Records|homestead applications]] for Kansas and all other states.<br>  
*[[Family History Library]], Salt Lake City, 450 computers, 3,400 databases, 3.1 million microforms, 4,500 periodicals, 310,000 books of worldwide family and local histories, censuses, civil, church, immigration, ethnic, military, and Mormon records.
+
*[[Family History Library]], Salt Lake City, 450 computers, 3,400 databases, 3.1 million microforms, 4,500 periodicals, 310,000 books of worldwide family and local histories, censuses, civil, church, immigration, ethnic, military, and Mormon records.<br><br>
*[[Children's Aid Society]], NYC, archives searches ($) for adoptions, and orphan train riders.<br>
 
*[[New York Foundling Hospital]], can do records research for close relatives only.<br><br>
 
  
 
'''''Neighboring Collections'''''<br>  
 
'''''Neighboring Collections'''''<br>  
  
 +
*[http://www.cloudgenealogy.com/ Cloud County Genealogical Society] newspapers, church records, censuses, plat maps, vital records, family histories, local histories at the Frank Carlson Library. <br>
 +
*[http://www.cloudcountyks.org/OTHEROFFICES/HistoricalSocietyMuseum/tabid/7139/Default.aspx Cloud County Historical Society Museum] has a small research collection.<br>
 +
*[http://www.cloudcountyks.org/CountyClerk/tabid/3771/Default.aspx Cloud County Clerk] has births, marriages, and deaths 1885-1910.
 +
*[http://www.cloudcountyks.org/RegisterofDeeds/tabid/3780/Default.aspx Cloud County Register of Deeds], land records.<br>
 +
*[http://www.kscourts.org/Judicial-District-12/12dstct.htm District Court Clerk] has divorce records.<br>
 +
*[http://www.fcarlsonlib.org/ Frank Carlson Library], Concordia, houses the Cloud County Genealogical Society collection. <br>
 +
*Cloud County Probate Judge has probate and court records.<br>
 
*[[Kansas Historical Society]], Topeka, has indexes, photos, letters, diaries, newspapers, maps, censuses, vital records, family histories, land records, railroads, and county place information. <br>  
 
*[[Kansas Historical Society]], Topeka, has indexes, photos, letters, diaries, newspapers, maps, censuses, vital records, family histories, land records, railroads, and county place information. <br>  
 
*[[Kansas Department of Health and Environment|Kansas Dept. of Health and Environment]], Topeka, births/deaths since 1911; marriages since 1913.<br>  
 
*[[Kansas Department of Health and Environment|Kansas Dept. of Health and Environment]], Topeka, births/deaths since 1911; marriages since 1913.<br>  
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*[[Wichita State University Library]], Wichita, biography, history, law, and JSTOR.<br>  
 
*[[Wichita State University Library]], Wichita, biography, history, law, and JSTOR.<br>  
 
*[[University of Kansas Libraries]], Lawrence, government records, maps, newspapers, periodicals, Kansas and Douglas County history especially 1854-1861, and overland trails.<br>  
 
*[[University of Kansas Libraries]], Lawrence, government records, maps, newspapers, periodicals, Kansas and Douglas County history especially 1854-1861, and overland trails.<br>  
*[[Iola Public Library]], 4000 genealogy books, 12,500 microfilms, help from genealogist volunteers, and access to HeritageQuest Online.<br>  
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*[[Iola Public Library]], Iola, Kansas, 4000 genealogy books, 12,500 microfilms, help from genealogist volunteers, and access to HeritageQuest Online.<br><br>
*[http://www.cloudgenealogy.com/ Cloud County Genealogical Society] newspapers, church records, censuses, plat maps, vital records, family histories, local histories at the Frank Carlson Library.  
+
 
*[http://www.cloudcountyks.org/OTHEROFFICES/HistoricalSocietyMuseum/tabid/7139/Default.aspx Cloud County Historical Society Museum] has a small research collection.<br>
+
=== For Further Reading  ===
*[http://www.cloudcountyks.org/CountyClerk/tabid/3771/Default.aspx Cloud County Clerk] has births, marriages, and deaths 1885-1910.  
+
 
*[http://www.cloudcountyks.org/RegisterofDeeds/tabid/3780/Default.aspx Cloud County Register of Deeds], land records.<br>
+
*Janet Coble, ''Children of orphan trains&nbsp;: from New York to Illinois and beyond'' ([Springfield, Ill.]&nbsp;: Illinois State Genealogical Society, 1994). {{WorldCat|31950437|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|726007|item|disp=FHL Book 973 J3c}}. Mostly a name list with placing-out details.
*[http://www.kscourts.org/Judicial-District-12/12dstct.htm District Court Clerk] has divorce records.<br>  
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*Annette R. Fry, ''Orphan Train'' (New York, N.Y.: New Discovery Books, 1994). {{WorldCat|29181847|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|756810|item|disp=FHL Book 973 J3f}}. Brief history of the movement.
*[http://www.fcarlsonlib.org/ Frank Carlson Library], Concordia, houses the Cloud County Genealogical Society collection. <br>
+
*Marilyn Irvin Holt, ''The orphan trains&nbsp;: placing out in America'' (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1992). {{WorldCat|24377482|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|502704|item|disp=FHL Book 973 J3h}}. Scholarly history of the movement.  
*Cloud County Probate Judge has probate and court records.<br><br>
+
*Mary Ellen Johnson, comp., ''Orphan train riders: their own stories'', 6&nbsp;vols. (Baltimore, Md.: Orphan Train Heritage Society of America, 1992-2007). {{WorldCat|26565890|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|609165|item|disp=FHL Fiche (v. 1) 6104624; Film (v. 5-6) 2421593 Items 2-3; Book 973 J3j}}. Some of the stories are second-hand.  
 +
*Clark Kidder, ''Orphan trains and their precious cargo&nbsp;: the life's work of Rev. H. D. Clarke'' (Bowie, Md.: Heritage Books, 2001). {{WorldCat|47922957|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|1012174|item|disp=FHL Book 973 J3k}}. Town-by-town distribution lists.  
 +
*Donna M. Nelson, ''La Porte's orphan train children&nbsp;: the children's homes, orphanages and training school of Julia E. Work'' (La Porte, Indiana&nbsp;: D. M. Nelson, 2008). {{WorldCat|228429238|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|1492981|item|disp=FHL Book 977.291/L1 J3n}}. History and list of local orphanage residents.  
 +
*Orphan Train Heritage Society of America, ''Crossroads'' (newsletter). {{WorldCat|18269621|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|1468991|item|disp=FHL Book 973 J35n}}. Articles about about orphan train history, rider stories, and organization news.
 +
*Tom Riley, ''Orphan Train Riders&nbsp;: a brief history of the orphan train era (1854-1929): with entrance records from the American Female Guardian Society's Home for the Friendless in New York,'' 2&nbsp;vols. (Westminster, Md.: Heritage Books, 2005-2006). {{WorldCat|61716904|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|1332878|item|disp=FHL Book 973 J3r}}. Mostly AFGS name lists with references to original documents.
 +
*Andrea Warren, ''We rode the orphan trains'' (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001). {{WorldCat|45172785|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}. Rider stories for Elementary and Junior High audiences.  
 +
*Patricia J Young, and Frances E Marks, ''Tears on paper&nbsp;: the history and life stories of the orphan train riders'' ([Bella Vista, Ark.]&nbsp;: P.J. Young&nbsp;; [Idaho]&nbsp;: F.E. Marks, 1990). {{WorldCat|22393656|disp=At various libraries (WorldCat)}}; {{FHL|472006|item|disp=FHL Book 973 J3y}}. Rider stories.<br><br>
 +
 
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=== Related Websites  ===
 +
 
 +
*[[United States Adoption Research]] Research Wiki article.
 +
*[http://www.cyndislist.com/railroads/orphan-trains/ Orphan Trains] Cyndi's List of Genealogical Sites on the Internet.<br><br>
  
 
=== Sources  ===
 
=== Sources  ===

Revision as of 14:55, 4 October 2012

National Orphan Train Complex

Orphan train research helps find foster children between 1853 and 1930 who rode trains from New York City, Boston, or Chicago to new homes in other states or Canada. The genealogy of many of these 200,000 orphaned, abandoned, or homeless children can often be traced back to the Children's Aid Society, or the New York Foundling Hospital, among others.
Orphan Train Museum at the Union Pacific Railroad station, grand opening in 2007 at Concordia, Kansas.


Contact Information

E-mail:[1]  orphantraindepot@gmail.com

Address:[1]

National Orphan Train Complex
300 Washington St.
PO. Box 322
Concordia, KS 66901

Telephone:[1]  785-243-4471

Hours and holidays:[1]  

Tuesday thru Friday: 10:00am-Noon, and 1:00pm-4:00pm
Saturday: 10:00am-4:00pm
Closed:  Sunday, Monday, and all national holidays

Directions:  Google Map

Internet sites and databases:

Collection Description

The National Orphan Train Museum and Research Center (a.k.a. Complex) collect, preserve, interpret, and disseminate knowledge about the orphan trains, the children and the agents who rode them.[2] This includes the history of the orphan train movement, and the stories of the children, photos, artifacts, and an archival collection. Also, they maintain a rider registry, a speakers' bureau, and the organization's online news.

NOTC has 66 volumes of orphan train rider records of the American Female Guarding Society (AFGS), photos, about 20,000 rider records, 9,700 names in computer databases, and Internet access to Ancestry.com.[3]

Tips

  • Please contact Amanda Wahlmeier, curator, before visiting so she can see if NOTC archives have records of your person.
  • NOTC charges $20 for their research resources.
  • General admission: $5.00 Adults;  $3.00 Children under 12;  $4.00 Group rate for 10 or more people.[1]

Alternate Repositories

If you cannot visit or find a source at the National Orphan Train Complex, a similar source may be available at one of the following.

Overlapping Collections

Neighboring Collections

For Further Reading

Related Websites

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 General Information at National Orphan Train Complex, Inc. (accessed 25 September 2012).
  2. NOTC Home at National Orphan Train Complex, Inc. (accessed 26 September 2012).
  3. Amanda Wahlmeier, Orphan Train Research Center curator, orphantraindepot@gmail.com, 28 September 2012, e-mail to David Dilts, DiltsGD@familysearch.org.