Louisiana in the Civil War

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United States   Gotoarrow.png  U.S. Military   Gotoarrow.png  Louisiana   Gotoarrow.png   Louisiana Military   Gotoarrow.png   Louisiana in the Civil War


Battle of New Orleans, April 24, 1862

Introduction

Before the Civil War, Louisiana was a major slave state. In 1860, 47% of the population was in slavery. However Louisiana also had one of the largest free black populations in the United States.[1] 

On January 26, 1861, Louisiana seceded from the United States. However sections of the state were strongly Union, so the U.S. Congress made those parts a state and allowed it to have a governor and U.S. Congressmen.[1] 

Louisiana formed 265 military units for the Confederacy[2] and 23 for the Union.[3] [4]

For additional information, see the Wikipedia article, Louisiana in the American Civil War.

Louisiana Military Units

Most units were numbered, however, some were named. See the table below for lists of the regiments, battalions, batteries, and other units.

The information in the lists of Louisiana Military Units comes from the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors web site. This web site also can be searched by the name of a soldier.

Louisiana Units by Number or by Name
Confed. Units
1st-3rd
4th-22nd
23rd-36th
A-E
F-M
N-Z





Union Units
1st-7th
A to Z





Louisiana Units by Type of Unit
Confed. Units
Infantry
Cavalry
Artillery
Reserves
Militia
Rangers
Other





Union Units
Infantry
Cavalry
Colored Troops
Other





Sources and Resources

Louisiana soldiers served in both the Union and the Confederate armies. Indexes to the service records and the compiled Confederate service records are at the Family History Library. The service records for both armies are at the National Archives.

Confederate Pensions

The Louisiana State Archives Library has posted an online Confederate pension index . The Family History Library collection holds an index to Confederate application records for pensions 1898-1944. (Family History Libraryfilms 1412743 Items 3-6 and 1412744 Item 1) A record of pensioners 1889-1940 contains abstracted information and may include name, residence, company or regiment, date, place and nature of wound received, disability, where and when paroled or discharged, if discharged where remaining until surrender, cause of death of widow's husband, where and when died, date of granting pension, monthly amount, and date of application. (Family History Library films 1412742 Item 1 and 1412743 Items 1-2)  The Family History Library collection also holds a group widows' applications, consisting mainly of letters concerning their applications dated 1912-1936. (Family History Library film 1704156 Item 17).  Copies of Confederate pension applications can be ordered from the Louisiana State Archives.  Union army pensions are available at the National Archives.

In 1911 a special census was taken of Confederate veterans or their widows. The census is arranged alphabetically by parish and is onFamily History Library film 483489 and 1704157 item 14. The original census and similar records are at the New Orleans Public Library.

Union Pensions

Civil War Pension Index Cards - A free Internet index to pension applications of veterans who served in the US Army between 1861-1917 is available on FamilySearch Record Search. Each card gives the soldier’s name, application and certificate numbers, state of enlistment, and might include rank and death information. Other wars, of that time period, may be included.

Veteran Lists

Booth, Andrew B. Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers and Louisiana Confederate Commands. 3 vols. New Orleans, Louisiana: N.p., 1920. (Family History Library FHL films 1305383 item 10, 1305383-85)

Bartlett, Napier. Military Record of Louisiana: Including Biographical and Historical Papers Relating to the Military Organizations of the State. 1875. Reprint. Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana State University Press, 1964. FHL 976.3 M2b

Southern Claims Commission

If a Union sympathizer in Louisiana claimed a loss during the Civil War due to Union military confiscation, he could apply to the Southern Claims Commission for reimbursement. Only a few applied per parish, but their neighbors were called as witnesses and asked dozens of questions. Hundreds of the residents of all kinds in a parish may be mentioned in answers to Commission questions, and their wartime activities described. To learn how to find records mentioning these neighbors in Louisiana parishes during the Civil War see the Southern Claims Commission.


References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Wikipedia.com, Louisiana in the American Civil War, (accessed 14 February 2011).
  2. National Park Service, The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System (accessed 14 February 2011).
  3. Civil War Archive, Union Regimental Index, Louisiana, (accessed 14 February 2011).
  4. National Park Service, The Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System lists only 11 Union Units for Louisiana(accessed 14 February 2011).