Lincoln's Inn, Middlesex Genealogy

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England  Gotoarrow.png  Middlesex Gotoarrow.png  Middlesex Parishes Gotoarrow.png Lincoln's Inn

Parish History

Lincoln's Inn is situated in Holborn, in the London Borough of Camden, just on the border with the City of London and the City of Westminster, and across the road from Royal Courts of Justice.

The first mention of a Chapel in Lincoln's Inn comes from 1428. By the 17th century this had become too small, and discussions started about building a new one in 1608.[32] The current Chapel was built between 1620 and 1823 by Inigo Jones, and was extensively rebuilt in 1797 and again in 1883. Other repairs took place in 1685, after the consultation of Christopher Wren, and again in 1915. The Chapel is built on a series of pillars, and has acted (sometimes simultaneously) as a Crypt, meeting place and place of recreation. For many years only Benchers were allowed to be buried in the Crypt, with the last one being interned on 15 May 1852. Before that, however, it was open to any member of servant of the society; in 1829 a former Preacher was interned, and in 1780 William Turner, described as Hatch-keeper and Washpot to this Honble. Society", was buried.[33] The Chapel features an organ (installed in 1820, and rebuilt in 1969), and a Bell, which was said to date from 1596, although this is not considered likely. Traditionally, the bell would chime a curfew at 9pm, with a stroke for each year of the current Treasurer's age. The bell would also chime between 12:30 and 1:00pm when a Bencher had died.[34] Inside the chapel are six stained glass windows, three on each side, designed by the Van Linge family.

The Honourable Society of Lincoln's Inn is one of four Inns of Court in London to which barristers of England and Wales belong and where they are called to the Bar. The other three are Middle Temple, Inner Temple and Gray's Inn. Although Lincoln's Inn is able to trace its official records beyond those of the other three, by tradition, none of the Inns claims to be the oldest of the four. It is believed to be named for Lincoln de Lacy, the third Earl of Lincoln.

From Lincoln's Inn Society site

Resources

Civil Registration

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Church records

Contributor: Include here information for parish registers, Bishop’s Transcripts, non conformist and other types of church records, such as parish chest records. Add the contact information for the office holding the original records. Add links to the Family History Library Catalog showing the film numbers in their collection

Census records

Contributor: Include an overview if there is any unique information, such as the census for X year was destroyed. Add a link to online sites for indexes and/or images. Also add a link to the Family History Library Catalog showing the film numbers in their collection.

Probate records

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Middlesex Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Maps and Gazetteers

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Web sites

Contributor: Add any relevant sites that aren’t mentioned above.