Difference between revisions of "Kiowa Indians"

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1868 removed to _____with the Cmanche and Kiowa Apache  
 
1868 removed to _____with the Cmanche and Kiowa Apache  
  
1892 meases killed more than  300 of the Kiowa, Comanche and Kiowa Apache
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1892 meases killed more than  300 of the Kiowa, Comanche and Kiowa Apache  
  
 
1860's Govenor John Evans encouraged a campaign of extermination against the Indians in the territory.  
 
1860's Govenor John Evans encouraged a campaign of extermination against the Indians in the territory.  
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November 29, 1864 Sand Creek Massacre Colorado mlitia under the command of Colonel John Chivington engaged in battle against a friendly group of Kiow - Black Kettle's camp where an American Flag flew over the camp, the tribe had been promised protection as long as the flag flew over their camp.  More than 100 Kiowa were killed.   
 
November 29, 1864 Sand Creek Massacre Colorado mlitia under the command of Colonel John Chivington engaged in battle against a friendly group of Kiow - Black Kettle's camp where an American Flag flew over the camp, the tribe had been promised protection as long as the flag flew over their camp.  More than 100 Kiowa were killed.   
  
1864 Kit Carson....
+
1864 Kit Carson led troops against the Kiowa adn Comanche Adope Walls in the Texas Panhandle destroying 176 tipis and employing the scorched earth policy.  
  
 
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Revision as of 21:40, 9 December 2009

 

Cultural area: Great Plains

Linguistic group: Kiowan

Federal Status: recognized

Kiowas Societies: Buffalo Doctor Society; Owl Doctor Society; Sun Dance Shield Society; Eagle Shield Society; only men were members of these societies.  There was one society of a select older group of women known as Bear Women Society.

Pictoral history of the tribe known as winter and summer counts

History

1781 a smallpox epidemic killed an estimated 2,000 Kiowa

1785 Left the Black Hills areadue to conflict with Cheyenne-Arapaho and Sioux.

Unique Military advancement; some soldiers known as "Dog Soldiers"

1790 Southern Kiowa move with Comanche to what is now New Mexico.

1801 Smallpox epidemic loss of nearly half of the tribe

1806 Northern Kiowa reunite with Southern Kiowa

1816 Smallpox epidemic

1833 Cut-Throat Massacre: Osage Indians attact Kiowas camp killing many

1849 Cholera killed more than half of the tribe

1868 removed to _____with the Cmanche and Kiowa Apache

1892 meases killed more than  300 of the Kiowa, Comanche and Kiowa Apache

1860's Govenor John Evans encouraged a campaign of extermination against the Indians in the territory.

November 29, 1864 Sand Creek Massacre Colorado mlitia under the command of Colonel John Chivington engaged in battle against a friendly group of Kiow - Black Kettle's camp where an American Flag flew over the camp, the tribe had been promised protection as long as the flag flew over their camp.  More than 100 Kiowa were killed. 

1864 Kit Carson led troops against the Kiowa adn Comanche Adope Walls in the Texas Panhandle destroying 176 tipis and employing the scorched earth policy.


Tribal Headquarters

Records

Treaties:

March 26, 1837

July 27 1853 Fort Atkinson

October 18, 1865

October 21, 1867

Important Web Sites

References


Bibliography

  • Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives; Record Group 75, Records of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
  • Hodge, Frederick Webb. Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1906 Available online.
  • Klein, Barry T., ed. Reference Encyclopedia of the American Indian. Nyack, New York: Todd Publications, 2009. 10th ed. WorldCat 317923332; FHL book 970.1 R259e.
  • Malinowski, Sharon and Sheets, Anna, eds. The Gale Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes. Detroit: Gale Publishing, 1998. 4 volumes. Includes: Lists of Federally Recognized Tribes for U.S., Alaska, and Canada – pp. 513-529 Alphabetical Listing of Tribes, with reference to volume and page in this series Map of “Historic Locations of U.S. Native Groups” Map of “Historic Locations of Canadian Native Groups” Map of “Historic Locations of Mexican, Hawaiian and Caribbean Native Groups” Maps of “State and Federally Recognized U.S. Indian Reservations. WorldCat 37475188; FHL book 970.1 G131g.
Vol. 1 -- Northeast, Southeast, Caribbean
Vol. 2 -- Great Basin, Southwest, Middle America
Vol. 3 -- Arctic, Subarctic, Great Plains, Plateau
Vol. 4 -- California, Pacific Northwest, Pacific Islands
  • Sturtevant, William C. Handbook of North American Indians. 20 vols., some not yet published. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1978– .
Volume 1 -- Not yet published
Volume 2 -- Indians in Contemporary Society (pub. 2008) -- WorldCat 234303751
Volume 3 -- Environment, Origins, and Population (pub. 2006) -- WorldCat 255572371
Volume 4 -- History of Indian-White Relations (pub. 1988) -- WorldCat 19331914; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.4.
Volume 5 -- Arctic (pub. 1984) -- WorldCat 299653808; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.5.
Volume 6 -- Subarctic (pub. 1981) -- WorldCat 247493742; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.6.
Volume 7 -- Northwest Coast (pub. 1990) -- WorldCat 247493311
Volume 8 -- California (pub. 1978) -- WorldCat 13240086; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.8.
Volume 9 -- Southwest (pub. 1979) -- WorldCat 26140053; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.9.
Volume 10 -- Southwest (pub. 1983) -- WorldCat 301504096; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.10.
Volume 11 -- Great Basin (pub. 1986) -- WorldCat 256516416; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.11.
Volume 12 -- Plateau (pub. 1998) -- WorldCat 39401371; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.12.
Volume 13 -- Plains, 2 vols. (pub. 2001) -- WorldCat 48209643
Volume 14 -- Southeast (pub. 2004) -- WorldCat 254277176
Volume 15 -- Northwest (pub. 1978) -- WorldCat 356517503; FHL book 970.1 H191h v.15.
Volume 16 -- Not yet published
Volume 17 -- Languages (pub. 1996) -- WorldCat 43957746
Volume 18 -- Not yet published
Volume 19 -- Not yet published
Volume 20 -- Not yet published