Difference between revisions of "Great Snoring, Norfolk Genealogy"

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== Parish History  ==
 
== Parish History  ==
  
SNORING, GREAT (St. Mary), a '''parish''', in the union of Walsingham, hundred of North Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from Little Walsingham. <ref>Lewis, Samuel A., [http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51285#s29 ''A Topographical Dictionary of England''] (1848), pp. 126-129. Date accessed: 19 March 2013.</ref>
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SNORING, GREAT (St. Mary), a '''parish''', in the union of Walsingham, hundred of North Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from Little Walsingham. <ref>Lewis, Samuel A., [http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51285#s29 ''A Topographical Dictionary of England''] (1848), pp. 126-129. Date accessed: 19 March 2013.</ref>  
  
 
<br> Great Snoring St Mary is an Ancient parish in the Walsingham deanery of the Diocese of Norwich.<br>  
 
<br> Great Snoring St Mary is an Ancient parish in the Walsingham deanery of the Diocese of Norwich.<br>  

Revision as of 20:41, 8 April 2013

England  Gotoarrow.png  Norfolk Gotoarrow.png  Norfolk Parishes

Parish History

SNORING, GREAT (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of North Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from Little Walsingham. [1]


Great Snoring St Mary is an Ancient parish in the Walsingham deanery of the Diocese of Norwich.

The Domesday Book calls the village by the Saxon name Snaringa/Snarringes, named after an inhabitant called Snear. The book includes mention of a water mill, which now features on the village sign.

On 12 April 1836 Walsingham Poor Law Union was formed, and a new Walsingham Union workhouse was built at Great Snoring in the same year to accommodate up to 250 inmates. The architect was William Thorold, and he based it on Sampson Kempthorne's model cruciform plan published by the Poor Law Commissioners in 1835. Four accommodation wings were joined to a central supervisory area, allowing segregation of different categories of inmate. Areas between the wings were used as exercise space. Workshops and service buildings around the edge gave the overall site an octagonal shape. To the east of the site a chapel was built.

After the closure of the workhouse, the buildings had various uses: as a smallpox hospital in the 1930s; by the Civil Defence in the 1950s; and most recently, plans to convert the building into 35 flats were approved in 1961. But no conversion was carried out and the buildings have now been demolished

Resources

Civil Registration

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

  • Walsingham 1837-1938
  • Fakenham 1939-1974

The Register Office, Fakenham Connect, Oak Street, Fakenham, NR21 9SR.
Tel: 01328 850111. E-mail: registration.fakenham@norfolk.gov.ukPD

Church records

Contributor: Include here information for parish registers, Bishop’s Transcripts, non conformist and other types of church records, such as parish chest records. Add the contact information for the office holding the original records. Add links to the Family History Library Catalog showing the film numbers in their collection

Images of the parish registers may be viewed online in Historic Records (formerly Record Search) Norfolk Record Office reference PD 223

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tinstaafl/Church_Pages/snoring_gt.htm for transcripts of Baptisms Norfolk Baptism Project


Census records

a. 

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library.




Poor Law Unions

http://www.workhouses.org.uk/index.html?Walsingham/Walsingham.shtml


Walsingham Union was incorporated under the terms of the 1834 Act, and the union workhouse was built at Great Snoring, but not completed until 1838. The Walsingham Union Workhouse at Great Snoring was opened in 1838. It was situated close to the boundary between the parishes of Great Snoring and Thursford and was sometimes known as Thursford Workhouse. Poor Law Unions were abolished in 1930 and the responsibilities of Walsingham Union Board of Guardians were taken over by Norfolk County Council Guardians' Committee No. 7. From 1930 the former Workhouse became known as Walsingham Public Assistance Institution. On 26 and 27 June 1934 the remaining thirty inmates (including two infants but no children) were transferred to West Beckham and Gressenhall Institutions and Walsingham Institution officially closed on 30 June 1934. The building was subsequently adapted for use as a smallpox hospital. By 1976 the building was derelict and was demolished in the early 1990s.
Acquisition Received by the Norfolk Record Office on 26 February 1982 (C/GP 19/192-198) and on unknown dates.

Copies C/GP19/1-6, 131, 133-135, 137, 141, 143-146, 148, 150-151, 173-181 are on microfilm.
RelatedMaterial For records of Guardians Committee No. 7 (including the administration of Red House Children's Home in Little Snoring and the boarding-out of children), see C/GC 7. See Public Assistance Sub-Committee minutes, 11 July 1934 and 12 September 1934, C/C 10/455. The records of the County Architect's Department include plans of the alterations for use as a smallpox hospital dated February 1937, see C/AR 1/29-31. The one inch to one mile Ordnance Survey Map of 1954 designates the building 'smallpox hospital'.

Norfolk Poor Law Unions

Probate records

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Norfolk Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Maps and Gazetteers

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

Web sites

http://www.achurchnearyou.com/great-snoring-st-mary/ for information about the parish

http://www.britishlistedbuildings.co.uk/en-223566-church-of-st-mary-great-snoring British Listed building

http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/greatsnoring/greatsnoring.htm Norfolk Churches website

Reference

  1. Lewis, Samuel A., A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 126-129. Date accessed: 19 March 2013.