Open main menu

Eyam, Derbyshire Genealogy

Guide to Eyam, Derbyshire ancestry, family history, and genealogy: parish registers, transcripts, census records, birth records, marriage records, and death records.

Eyam, Derbyshire
Eyam St Lawrence Derbyshire.jpg
Eyam St Lawrence Derbyshire
Type Ancient Parish
Civil Jurisdictions
Hundred High Peake
County Derbyshire
Poor Law Union Bakewell
Registration District Bakewell
Records begin
Parish registers: 1630
Bishop's Transcripts: 1662
Ecclesiastical Jurisdictions
Rural Deanery Eyam
Diocese Lichfield
Province Canterbury
Legal Jurisdictions
Probate Court Court of the Bishop of Lichfield (Episcopal Consistory)
Location of Archive
Derbyshire Record Office

Parish HistoryEdit

EYAM (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby; containing, with the townships of Woodland-Eyam and Foolow. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. [1]


Eyam is associated as the "plague village". The plague had been brought to the village in a flea-infested bundle of cloth that was delivered to tailor George Viccars from London.
Within a week he was dead and was buried on 7 September 1665. After the initial deaths, the townspeople turned to their rector, the Reverend William Mompesson, and the Puritan Minister Thomas Stanley. They introduced a number of precautions to slow the spread of the illness from May 1666. These included the arrangement that families were to bury their own dead and the relocation of church services from the parish church of St. Lawrence to Cucklett Delph to allow villagers to separate themselves, reducing the risk of infection. Perhaps the best-known decision was to quarantine the entire village to prevent further spread of the disease. The plague raged in the village for 14 months and it is stated that it killed at least 260 villagers with only 83 villagers surviving out of a population of 350. This figure has been challenged on a number of occasions with alternative figures of 430 survivors from a population of around 800 being given.

When the first outsiders visited Eyam a year later, they found that fewer than a quarter of the village had survived the plague. Survival appeared random, as many plague survivors had close contact with the bacterium but never caught the disease. For example, Elizabeth Hancock never became ill despite burying six children and her husband in eight days (the graves are known as the Riley graves). The unofficial village gravedigger Marshall Howe also survived, despite handling many infected bodies, as he had earlier survived catching the disease.

ResourcesEdit

Civil RegistrationEdit

Birth, marriages and deaths were kept by the government, from July 1837 to the present day. The civil registration article tells more about these records. There are several Internet sites with name lists or indexes. A popular site is FreeBMD.

Church recordsEdit

Eyam parish registers of christenings, marriages and burials are available online for the following years:

FS PRs = England, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1537-1918 (FamilySearch) - free
FS = FamilySearch - free
FREG = FreeREG - free
ANC 1 = Derbyshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials (Ancestry) - ($)
ANC 2 = Derbyshire, England, Church of England Records (Ancestry) - ($)
FMP Index = Derbyshire Baptism, Marriage, Burial Indexes (FindMyPast) - ($)
FMP = Derbyshire Baptisms, Marriages, Burials (FindMyPast) - ($)
MyH PRs = England, Derbyshire, Church of England Parish Registers, 1538-1910 (MyHeritage) - ($)
BOYD = England, Boyd's Marriage Indexes, 1538-1850 (FindMyPast) - free
IGI = International Genealogical Index (FamilySearch) - free[2]
FS Catalog PRs = FamilySearch Catalog Parish registers - free
FS Catalog BTs = FamilySearch Catalog Bishop's transcripts - free
Eyam Online Parish Records
Baptisms
Marriages
Burials
Indexes Images Indexes Images Indexes Images
FS PRs 1537-1918
1537-1918
1537-1918
FS 1538-1975
1538-1973
1538-1991
FREG 1538-1900s
1538-1900s
1538-1900s
ANC 1 1538-1812
1538-1812
1538-1812
ANC 2 1813-1916
1754-1932
1813-1991
FMP Index 1538-1910
1538-1910
1538-1910
FMP 1538-1920
1538-1920
1539-1998
MyH PRs 1538-1910
1538-1910
1538-1910
BOYD

1538-1850


IGI



FS Catalog PRs


FS Catalog BTs


To find the names of the neighboring parishes, use England Jurisdictions 1851 Map. In this site, search for the name of the parish, click on the location "pin", click Options and click List contiguous parishes.

Records are also available at the Derbyshire Record Office.

Non-Conformist ChurchesEdit
  • Wesleyan Methodist
  • Wesleyan Methodist Reform

Census recordsEdit

Census records from 1841 to 1911 are available online. For access, see England Census Records and Indexes Online. Census records from 1841 to 1891 are also available on film through a Family History Center or at the Family History Library.


Poor Law UnionsEdit

Bakewell Poor Law Union, Derbyshire

Probate recordsEdit

Records of wills, administrations, inventories, indexes, etc. were filed by the court with jurisdiction over this parish. Go to Derbyshire Probate Records to find the name of the court having primary jurisdiction. Scroll down in the article to the section Court Jurisdictions by Parish.

Maps and GazetteersEdit

Maps are a visual look at the locations in England. Gazetteers contain brief summaries about a place.

WebsitesEdit

Eyam on GENUKI

ReferencesEdit

  1. Samuel A. Lewis, A Topographical Dictionary of England,(1848), pp. 195-206.Date accessed: 15 April 2013.
  2. ArcherSoftware.co.uk