Difference between revisions of "England, Cheshire Probate Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)"

From FamilySearch Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m
(Why Should I Look at This Collection?)
 
(60 intermediate revisions by 24 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
{{FamilySearch_Collection
+
[[England Genealogy|England]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Cheshire, England Genealogy|Cheshire]] <br>
|location=England
 
|CID=CID1589492
 
|title=England, Cheshire probate records, 1492-1940}}<br>  
 
 
 
== Record Description ==
 
 
 
The date ranges for available Cheshire probate records are from 1492 to 1940.
 
 
 
There are several different types of probate records, but wills are the most informative. Original wills were generally on loose pieces of paper, copies of which were entered into books. Act books are brief paragraphs telling that the executor appeared in court and was approved to distribute the goods as set forth in the will. Administrations are documents created when a person died without leaving a will. Older wills from 1492 through to the late 17th or early 18th century will have varying degrees of legibility. There will also be some Latin in the wills in the middle of the 17th century. Wills probated up to 1857 were handled and kept by the Consistory Court of the Diocese Chester; thereafter (1858-1940) they were handled by the District Probate Registry for Cheshire.
 
 
 
Until 1837 a male as young as 14 and a girl as young as 12 could make a will; thereafter one had to be 21 to make a will. Wills for married women before 1882 are rare because they were not allowed to have property. Those who had land or money, such as merchants, shopkeepers, farmers, or laborers, created wills. About 10% of the heads of households were probated before 1857, but as many as 25% left a will or was mentioned in one. There are about 143,000 names indexed in Cheshire Probate Record indexes.
 
 
 
Probate records document the transfer of possessions after a person dies. Wills, in particular, were written to ensure that the property and personal estate of a deceased person would be distributed according to his or her wishes. The court would then call in the next of kin and assign them the duty of distributing the goods. The administrator is usually the only person mentioned besides the court officials.
 
  
The records are quite reliable because of their legal nature.  
+
This collection consists of probate records from the county of Cheshire for the years 1492-1940.
 +
{{England HR Infobox
 +
| CID=CID1589492
 +
| title=England, Cheshire, probate records, 1492-1940
 +
| location=England
 +
| LOC_01 =Cheshire
 +
| LOC_02 =
 +
| LOC_03 =
 +
| loc_map =Cheshire location.png 
 +
| record_type =Probate
 +
| start_year =1492
 +
| end_year =1940
 +
| FS_URL_01 =[[Cheshire Genealogy]] 
 +
| FS_URL_02 =[[Cheshire Probate Records]]
 +
| FS_URL_03 =[[England Genealogy]]
 +
| FS_URL_04 =
 +
| FS_URL_05 =
 +
| FS_URL_06 =
 +
| FS_URL_07 =
 +
| FS_URL_08 =
 +
| FS_URL_09 =
 +
| FS_URL_10 =
 +
| RW_URL_01 =[http://www.disley.net/ Disley, Lyme Handley; Taxal &amp; Whaley in Cheshire]
 +
| RW_URL_02 =[http://archivedatabases.cheshire.gov.uk/RecordOfficeWillEPayments/search.aspx Record Office Wills] - $ 
 +
| RW_URL_03 =
 +
| RW_URL_04 =
 +
| RW_URL_05 =
 +
| custodian =[http://archives.cheshire.gov.uk/home.aspx Cheshire Archives and Local Studies]
 +
}}
  
=== Citation for This Collection ===
+
== Why Should I Look at This Collection? ==
 +
Probate records are a good source for determining family relationships, and the other information they provide can provide clues to other records which might be found. These records also have relatively good coverage. Even though only about ten percent of the population ever left a will, it is estimated that approximately a quarter of the population was mentioned in wills.
  
The following citation refers to the original source of the information published in FamilySearch.org Historical Records collections. Sources include the author, custodian, publisher, and archive for the original records.
+
For more information on the history and significance of probate records, see the '''[[England Probate Records]]''' page.
  
{{Collection citation | text= "England, Cheshire Probate Records, 1492-1940" Index. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2013. District Probate Registry. Record Office, Chester.}}
+
== What Is in This Collection? ==
 +
This collection contains an index to probate records of many types. The original records are held at the [http://archives.cheshire.gov.uk/home.aspx Cheshire Archives].
  
[[England Cheshire Probate Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)#Citation_Example_for_a_Record_Found_in_This_Collection|Suggested citation format for a record in this collection.]]
+
Probate records document the transfer of possessions after death; this process requires several types of record to be kept. Wills ensure that the property and personal estate of a deceased are distributed according to their wishes. Act books are brief paragraphs telling that the executor has appeared in court and is approved to distribute the goods as set forth in the will. Administrations are documents created when a person died without leaving a will.
  
== Record Content ==
+
Those who had land or money and who were heads of their household created wills.After 1837, anyone over the age of 21 could leave a will; before this, men as young as 14 and women as young as 12 could leave a will. Non-widowed married women rarely left wills, as they were not allowed to own property until 1882.
 
 
These Cheshire probate records may contain the following information:
 
  
 +
==What Can This Collection Tell Me? ==
 +
'''Probate Records''' may contain:
 +
{| style="width:75%; vertical-align:top;"
 +
|style=" vertical-align:top; width:37%;"|
 +
<i>Before 1858</i>
 
*Names of relatives receiving an inheritance  
 
*Names of relatives receiving an inheritance  
 
*Names of executor(s)  
 
*Names of executor(s)  
Line 36: Line 56:
 
*Location where the deceased lived  
 
*Location where the deceased lived  
 
*Listing of any debt or funeral expenses to be paid  
 
*Listing of any debt or funeral expenses to be paid  
*Property names
+
*Property names  
 
+
|style=" vertical-align:top; width:37%;"|
These probate records after 1858 may contain the following information:
+
<i>Included after 1858</i>
 
 
 
*Name of individual  
 
*Name of individual  
 
*Location where the deceased lived  
 
*Location where the deceased lived  
Line 48: Line 67:
 
*Place where will was probated  
 
*Place where will was probated  
 
*Relative or relatives present at the time of death
 
*Relative or relatives present at the time of death
 +
|}
  
== How to Use the Records  ==
+
== How Do I Search This Collection? ==
 +
Before searching this collection, it is helpful to know:
 +
*The name of the person
 +
*A general date range for the record
 +
As you search, compare your results with this information to find a match.
  
To begin your search in the probate records, it would be helpful if you knew the following information:
+
=== Search the Index ===
 +
#Go to the '''{{RecordSearch|1589492|Collection Page|access=browse}}'''
 +
#Fill in the search boxes with the information you have
 +
#Click '''Search''' to return a list of possible matches
  
*Name of deceased
+
== What Do I Do Next? ==
*Approximate year and place of death
+
=== I Found the Person I Was Looking for, What Now? ===
 +
*Copy down all the information from the index entry.
 +
*Cite the record. See below for assistance citing this collection.
 +
*Use the information which has been discovered to find more. For instance, use the estimated age given in a marriage or burial record to calculate an approximate year of birth, if that is yet undetermined.
 +
*Use the information you have found to find the individual in other records. Particularly useful for research in nineteenth-century Cheshire are the [[England Census]], [[England Civil Registration|Civil Registration]], and [[England, Cheshire Parish Registers (FamilySearch Historical Records)|Parish Registers]].
 +
*Continue to search the index to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives.
 +
 +
=== I Can’t Find the Person I’m Looking for, What Now? ===
 +
*When looking for an individual with a common name, look at all the search results before deciding which is the correct person. Use other information, such as place of birth, age, occupation, or names of parents, to help with this decision. If listed, a personal title may be a clue to property ownership or occupation, either of which might be noted in other records.
 +
*Try variations of given names and surnames. An individual might appear under a different name in a record for a variety of reasons:
 +
:- An individual might have been listed under a middle name, [http://genealogy.about.com/od/first_names/fl/nicknamegiven-name-equivalents.htm nickname], or [[Abbreviations Found in Genealogy Records|abbreviation]] of their given name.
 +
:- Spelling was not standardized for much of the period of this collection, so names were often spelled as scribes heard them. Pay attention to how the name should have been pronounced and try spelling variations that could have that pronunciation.
 +
:- Some women returned to their maiden names after the death of their husbands.
 +
*Vary the search terms. For example, expand the date range or search by either the given name or surname to return broader list results.
 +
*Search the records of nearby locations. While most people never lived more than 20 miles from their place of birth, moves within this range were common. For this collection,bordering locations could include the English counties of Lancashire to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire and Shropshire to the south, or the Welsh counties of Denbighshire and Flintshire to the west.
 +
 +
For additional help searching online collections see [[FamilySearch Search Tips and Tricks]].
  
==== Search the Collection ====
+
== Citing This Collection ==
 +
Citing sources correctly makes it easier to refer to information which has already been found, so proper citations can help to keep track of research. Correct citations also allow others to check completed research by helping them find and examine records for themselves.
  
Fill in the requested information in the initial search page. This search will return a list of possible matches. Compare the information about the ancestors in the list to what you already know about your ancestors to determine if this is the correct family or person. You may need to look at several images and compare the information about the individuals listed in those images to your ancestors to make this determination.
+
Below are the proper citations to use for this whole collection as well as for individual records within it:
  
==== Using the Information  ====
+
'''Collection Citation'''<br>
 +
{{Collection citation | text= "England, Cheshire Probate Records, 1492-1940." Database. <i>FamilySearch</i>. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2017. District Probate Registry. Record Office, Chester.}} <br><br>
  
Use these records to find ancestors’ children and relatives in order to establish relationships that may be more difficult to prove in parish registers, especially before 1813. They are also good to confirm relationships in families where relationship is already established.
+
'''Record (or Index) Citation'''<br>
 
+
{{Record Citation Link
== Related Websites ==
+
|CID=CID1589492
 
+
|title=England, Cheshire, Probate Records, 1492-1940
*[http://www.disley.net/ Disley, Lyme Handley; Taxal &amp; Whaley in Cheshire]
+
}}
*[http://archivedatabases.cheshire.gov.uk/RecordOfficeWillEPayments/search.aspx Record Office Wills] - $
 
*[[Quick Research Links - England]]
 
 
 
== Related Wiki Articles ==
 
 
 
*[[Cheshire|Cheshire]]
 
*[[Cheshire Probate Records]]
 
*[[England|England]]
 
 
 
== Contributions to This Article ==
 
 
 
{{Contributor invite}}  
 
 
 
== Citing FamilySearch Historical Collections ==
 
 
 
When you copy information from a record, you should list where you found the information. This will help you or others to find the record again. It is also good to keep track of records where you did not find information, including the names of the people you looked for in the records.
 
 
 
A suggested format for keeping track of records that you have searched is found in the wiki article [[Help:How to Cite FamilySearch Collections]].
 
 
 
=== Citation Example for a Record Found in This Collection ===
 
  
"England, Cheshire Probate Records, 1492-1940," database, ''FamilySearch'' (http://familysearch.org: accessed 22 March 2012), John Barker, 1872; citing District Probate Registry, Probate Records, Family History Library microfilm, 457 reels, Cheshire Record Office, Chester, Great Britain.
+
== How Can I Contribute to the FamilySearch Wiki? ==
 +
{{Contributor invite}}
 +
[[Category:Cheshire FamilySearch Historical Records]]
  
[[Category:Cheshire]]
+
{{H-langs|en=England, Cheshire Probate Records (FamilySearch Historical Records)|pt=Inglaterra, Cheshire, Registros de Inventários (Registros Históricos do FamilySearch)}}

Latest revision as of 15:01, 31 May 2017

England Gotoarrow.png Cheshire

This collection consists of probate records from the county of Cheshire for the years 1492-1940.

Access the Records
England, Cheshire, probate records, 1492-1940 .
CID1589492
{{{CID2}}}
{{{CID3}}}
{{{CID4}}}
{{{CID5}}}
{{{CID6}}}
{{{CID7}}}
{{{CID8}}}
{{{CID9}}}
This article describes a collection of records at FamilySearch.org.
Cheshire,  England
Flag of England.png
Flag of England
Cheshire location.png
Location of Cheshire, England
England in United Kingdom.svg 2000px.png
Record Description
Record Type Probate
Collection years 1492-1940
FamilySearch Resources
Related Websites
Archive
Cheshire Archives and Local Studies


Why Should I Look at This Collection?

Probate records are a good source for determining family relationships, and the other information they provide can provide clues to other records which might be found. These records also have relatively good coverage. Even though only about ten percent of the population ever left a will, it is estimated that approximately a quarter of the population was mentioned in wills.

For more information on the history and significance of probate records, see the England Probate Records page.

What Is in This Collection?

This collection contains an index to probate records of many types. The original records are held at the Cheshire Archives.

Probate records document the transfer of possessions after death; this process requires several types of record to be kept. Wills ensure that the property and personal estate of a deceased are distributed according to their wishes. Act books are brief paragraphs telling that the executor has appeared in court and is approved to distribute the goods as set forth in the will. Administrations are documents created when a person died without leaving a will.

Those who had land or money and who were heads of their household created wills.After 1837, anyone over the age of 21 could leave a will; before this, men as young as 14 and women as young as 12 could leave a will. Non-widowed married women rarely left wills, as they were not allowed to own property until 1882.

What Can This Collection Tell Me?

Probate Records may contain:

Before 1858

  • Names of relatives receiving an inheritance
  • Names of executor(s)
  • Itemization of household goods and property
  • Date will was written
  • Date will was probated
  • Amounts of money and goods
  • Location where the deceased lived
  • Listing of any debt or funeral expenses to be paid
  • Property names

Included after 1858

  • Name of individual
  • Location where the deceased lived
  • Names of beneficiaries (usually surviving spouse and children)
  • Name of executor(s)
  • Names of witnesses
  • Date the will was probated
  • Place where will was probated
  • Relative or relatives present at the time of death

How Do I Search This Collection?

Before searching this collection, it is helpful to know:

  • The name of the person
  • A general date range for the record

As you search, compare your results with this information to find a match.

Search the Index

  1. Go to the Collection Page
  2. Fill in the search boxes with the information you have
  3. Click Search to return a list of possible matches

What Do I Do Next?

I Found the Person I Was Looking for, What Now?

  • Copy down all the information from the index entry.
  • Cite the record. See below for assistance citing this collection.
  • Use the information which has been discovered to find more. For instance, use the estimated age given in a marriage or burial record to calculate an approximate year of birth, if that is yet undetermined.
  • Use the information you have found to find the individual in other records. Particularly useful for research in nineteenth-century Cheshire are the England Census, Civil Registration, and Parish Registers.
  • Continue to search the index to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives.

I Can’t Find the Person I’m Looking for, What Now?

  • When looking for an individual with a common name, look at all the search results before deciding which is the correct person. Use other information, such as place of birth, age, occupation, or names of parents, to help with this decision. If listed, a personal title may be a clue to property ownership or occupation, either of which might be noted in other records.
  • Try variations of given names and surnames. An individual might appear under a different name in a record for a variety of reasons:
- An individual might have been listed under a middle name, nickname, or abbreviation of their given name.
- Spelling was not standardized for much of the period of this collection, so names were often spelled as scribes heard them. Pay attention to how the name should have been pronounced and try spelling variations that could have that pronunciation.
- Some women returned to their maiden names after the death of their husbands.
  • Vary the search terms. For example, expand the date range or search by either the given name or surname to return broader list results.
  • Search the records of nearby locations. While most people never lived more than 20 miles from their place of birth, moves within this range were common. For this collection,bordering locations could include the English counties of Lancashire to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire and Shropshire to the south, or the Welsh counties of Denbighshire and Flintshire to the west.

For additional help searching online collections see FamilySearch Search Tips and Tricks.

Citing This Collection

Citing sources correctly makes it easier to refer to information which has already been found, so proper citations can help to keep track of research. Correct citations also allow others to check completed research by helping them find and examine records for themselves.

Below are the proper citations to use for this whole collection as well as for individual records within it:

Collection Citation

"England, Cheshire Probate Records, 1492-1940." Database. FamilySearch. http://FamilySearch.org : accessed 2017. District Probate Registry. Record Office, Chester.

Record (or Index) Citation

When looking at a record, the citation is found below the record. You can search records in this collection by visiting the search page for England, Cheshire, Probate Records, 1492-1940.


How Can I Contribute to the FamilySearch Wiki?

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. We are looking for additional information that will help readers understand the topic and better use the available records. We also need translations for collection titles and images in articles about records written in languages other than English. For specific needs, please visit WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Please follow these guidelines as you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide.