Difference between revisions of "Congleton Congleton Chapel, Cheshire Genealogy"

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[[England]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Cheshire]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Cheshire Parishes]][[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  Congleton Chapel  
 
[[England]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Cheshire]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Cheshire Parishes]][[Image:Gotoarrow.png]]  Congleton Chapel  
  
&nbsp;<ref>Lewis, Samuel A.,[http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50893#s23 A Topographical Dictionary of England](1848), adapted 18 Jan 2013</ref><br>  
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CONGLETON, an incorporated market-town, a '''chapelry''', and the head of a union, in the '''parish of Astbury''', having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 31 miles (E. by S.) from Chester. The chapel, dedicated to St. Peter. At Congleton Moss, a church was dedicated to the Holy Trinity it was erected in 1845. Two districts or ecclesiastical parishes have been formed under Sir Robert Peel's act: in the one, St. Stephen's district, a chapel has been purchased from the dissenters, in the other, St. James', a church. There are places of worship for '''Independents, Primitive Methodists, Wesleyans, Unitarians, and Roman Catholics'''.&nbsp;<ref>Lewis, Samuel A.,[http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50893#s23 A Topographical Dictionary of England](1848), adapted 18 Jan 2013</ref><br>  
  
 
Congleton chapel, an ancient chapel mentioned in 1848 Lewis' ''A Topographical Dictionary of England, ''stood originally at the end of the bridge and next to the River Dane. Due to falling into ruin, it was demolished in&nbsp;the year 1810. It was a chapel of ease and stood within the civil parish boundary of Astbury St Mary's (which also see). The name of this chapel is unknown,  
 
Congleton chapel, an ancient chapel mentioned in 1848 Lewis' ''A Topographical Dictionary of England, ''stood originally at the end of the bridge and next to the River Dane. Due to falling into ruin, it was demolished in&nbsp;the year 1810. It was a chapel of ease and stood within the civil parish boundary of Astbury St Mary's (which also see). The name of this chapel is unknown,  

Revision as of 17:21, 22 January 2013

England Gotoarrow.png Cheshire Gotoarrow.png Cheshire ParishesGotoarrow.png  Congleton Chapel

CONGLETON, an incorporated market-town, a chapelry, and the head of a union, in the parish of Astbury, having separate jurisdiction, locally in the hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 31 miles (E. by S.) from Chester. The chapel, dedicated to St. Peter. At Congleton Moss, a church was dedicated to the Holy Trinity it was erected in 1845. Two districts or ecclesiastical parishes have been formed under Sir Robert Peel's act: in the one, St. Stephen's district, a chapel has been purchased from the dissenters, in the other, St. James', a church. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, Wesleyans, Unitarians, and Roman Catholics[1]

Congleton chapel, an ancient chapel mentioned in 1848 Lewis' A Topographical Dictionary of England, stood originally at the end of the bridge and next to the River Dane. Due to falling into ruin, it was demolished in the year 1810. It was a chapel of ease and stood within the civil parish boundary of Astbury St Mary's (which also see). The name of this chapel is unknown,


Please expand this article if you have more information about this chapel.
  1. Lewis, Samuel A.,A Topographical Dictionary of England(1848), adapted 18 Jan 2013