Difference between revisions of "Confederate Regular Troops in the Civil War"

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Records of the Confederate Army are located in the National Archives Record Group (RG109). They are described in:  
 
Records of the Confederate Army are located in the National Archives Record Group (RG109). They are described in:  
  
*Bethel, Elizabeth, compiler. ''[http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=604451&disp=Preliminary+inventory+of+the+War+Departm%20%20&columns=*,0,0 Preliminary Inventory of the War Department Collection of Confederate Records (Record Group 109).] Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, 1957. (FHL book 973 A33npi no. 101.)''
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:Bethel, Elizabeth, compiler. ''[http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=titledetails&titleno=604451&disp=Preliminary+inventory+of+the+War+Departm%20%20&columns=*,0,0 Preliminary Inventory of the War Department Collection of Confederate Records (Record Group 109).] Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, 1957. (FHL book 973 A33npi no. 101.)''
  
Additional Confederate records are at state archives and historical societies.  
+
The following archive may also be helpful in researching your Confederate ancestor:
 +
 
 +
:'''Confederate Research Center'''<br>P.O. Box 619<br>Hillsboro, TX 76645<br>Telephone: 817-582-2555, ext. 242<br>Internet: http://www.rootsweb.com/~mscivilw/csa_resc.html
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 +
 
 +
'''Confederate Amnesty Papers'''
  
The following archive may also be helpful in researching your Confederate ancestor:
+
When Andrew Johnson pardoned Confederates at the end of the Civil War on May 29, 1865, some had to apply for amnesty because they were not granted amnesty in the proclamation issued. To learn more about Amnesty and reasons for exclusion, see an explanation of the records at  [http://www.footnote.com/page/1566_amnesty_papers_18651867/ Fold3].
 +
 
 +
The Amnesty Papers are available from Fold3.com at [http://www.fold3.com/page/1566_amnesty_papers_18651867/ Confederate Amnesty Papers, 1865-1867] ($).
  
'''[http://www.rootsweb.com/~mscivilw/csa_resc.html Confederate Research Center]'''<br>P.O. Box 619<br>Hillsboro, TX 76645<br>Telephone: 817-582-2555, ext. 242
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'''Compiled Service Records'''
  
*[http://www.footnote.com/page/1566_amnesty_papers_18651867/ Confederate Amnesty Papers, 1865-1867 at Footnote] <br>
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The [http://go.fold3.com/civilwar_records Compiled Service Records] ($) (Fold3.com) of Confederate soldiers are available online. In the future, these records will be [http://www.archives.gov/press/press-releases/2007/nr07-41.html made available at no charge] through the National Archives web site. The service records are also available at no charge at [http://www.archives.gov/locations/archival-research.html National Archives research rooms]. The compiled service records consist of an envelope containing card abstracts taken from muster rolls, returns, pay vouchers, and other records. Service records may provide rank, unit, date of enlistment, length of service, age, place of birth, and date of death. For more information see [[Confederate Service Records|Confederate Service Records]].
  
When Andrew Johnson pardoned Confederates at the end of the Civil War on May 29, 1865, some had to apply for amnesty because they were not granted amnesty in the proclamation issued. To learn more about Amnesty and reasons for exclusion, see [http://www.footnote.com/page/1566_amnesty_papers_18651867/ "Amnesty Papers," 1865-1867].<br>
+
Additional Confederate records are at '''state archives''' and '''historical societies'''.
  
Additional Confederate records are on the [[United_States_Civil_War,_1861_to_1865|United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865]] Wiki page.
+
Also see  [[United_States_Civil_War,_1861_to_1865|United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865]] for more Confederate records.
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===

Revision as of 10:32, 23 August 2011

United States Gotoarrow.png U.S. Military Gotoarrow.png U.S. Civil War Gotoarrow.png Confederate Regular Troops in the Civil War


Confederate General Pierre Gustave Toutant (PGT) Beauregard (1818-1893)

Introduction

The Confederate Congress established a provisional then a permanent Confederate States Army by March 9, 1861. Control was given to the President of the Confederate States of America, Jefferson Davis.[1]

Under orders from President Davis, the troops under General P. G. T. Beauregard bomb Fort Sumter on April 12–13, 1861, the first battle in the Civil War.[1]

Tthe state militias supplemented the Confederate States Army. The state governments organized and commanded the state militias.[1]

No formal overall military commander or general-in-chief was designated until late in the war. This lack of centralized control was a strategic weakness.[1] Commanders were:

President Jefferson Davis, (Commander-in-Chief) He provided the strategic direction for Confederate land and naval forces. He was a former U.S. Army officer and U.S. Secretary of War.
General Samuel Cooper, (Adjutant General and Inspector General of the Army)
General Robert E. Lee, (General-in-Chief, January 31 to April 9, 1865) [1]

The above information, and additional information can be found in the Wikipedia article, Confederate States Army

Confederate Regular Troops Military Units

Most units were numbered, however, many were named. See the table below for lists of the regiments, battalions, batteries, and other units.

The information in the lists of Confederate Regular Troops Military Units comes from the Civil War Soldiers and Sailors web site. That web site also can be searched by the name of a soldier.

Confederate Regular Troops, Units by Number or by Name
Confed. Units
1st-20th
A-K
L-Z

Confederate Regular Troops, Units by Type of Unit
Confed. Units
Infantry
Cavalry
Artillery
Officers and Staff
Indian Units
Other



Records and Resources

Records of the Confederate Army are located in the National Archives Record Group (RG109). They are described in:

Bethel, Elizabeth, compiler. Preliminary Inventory of the War Department Collection of Confederate Records (Record Group 109). Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Service, General Services Administration, 1957. (FHL book 973 A33npi no. 101.)

The following archive may also be helpful in researching your Confederate ancestor:

Confederate Research Center
P.O. Box 619
Hillsboro, TX 76645
Telephone: 817-582-2555, ext. 242
Internet: http://www.rootsweb.com/~mscivilw/csa_resc.html


Confederate Amnesty Papers

When Andrew Johnson pardoned Confederates at the end of the Civil War on May 29, 1865, some had to apply for amnesty because they were not granted amnesty in the proclamation issued. To learn more about Amnesty and reasons for exclusion, see an explanation of the records at Fold3.

The Amnesty Papers are available from Fold3.com at Confederate Amnesty Papers, 1865-1867 ($).

Compiled Service Records

The Compiled Service Records ($) (Fold3.com) of Confederate soldiers are available online. In the future, these records will be made available at no charge through the National Archives web site. The service records are also available at no charge at National Archives research rooms. The compiled service records consist of an envelope containing card abstracts taken from muster rolls, returns, pay vouchers, and other records. Service records may provide rank, unit, date of enlistment, length of service, age, place of birth, and date of death. For more information see Confederate Service Records.

Additional Confederate records are at state archives and historical societies.

Also see United States Civil War, 1861 to 1865 for more Confederate records.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Wikipedia contributors, "Confederate States Army" in Wikipedia - the Free Encyclopedia, (accessed 28 April 2011)