Difference between revisions of "Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy"

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== Caswell County Courthouse  ==
 
== Caswell County Courthouse  ==
  
[[History of the Historic Caswell County, North Carolina Courthouse|History of the Historic Caswell County, North Carolina Courthouse]]
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[[History of the Historic Caswell County, North Carolina Courthouse|History of the Historic Caswell County, North Carolina Courthouse]]<br>
 
 
This historic old building has seen much. If these walls could talk many would listen. The Courthouse has seen proud times, troublesome times, and tragic times. It has endured occupation, murder, and fire. The first Caswell County public library was housed in its dark and mysterious basement. It was home to respected and loved Register of Deeds Burch Blaylock. And, it saw the murder of Senator John W. Stephens.<br><br>The Caswell County Courthouse was completed at the end of what has been called Caswell County's "Boom Era" -- from approximately 1830 until the Civil War. It is a handsome building, with a storied past. Now listed on the National Register of Historic Places, it no longer functions as the hub of county business, which is sad. Many can still remember when the Courthouse was alive with governmental and political activity. Many can still remember court week, election eve, and, possibly, just getting their first driver's license there. It was where you found the sheriff, the tax collector, the register of deeds, the clerk of the court, and, many years ago, the Freedman's Bureau. The air was electric, the smell of the building distinctive, as government unfolded before your eyes.<br><br>To many it is the symbol of the greatness of Caswell County. To others it is a reminder of the absolute worst in the hearts of men. However, after all this, the majestic Courthouse remains standing.<br><br>As late as April 1857, the county was still considering making repairs to the old courthouse. That building, the third Caswell County Courthouse, had been damaged by fire that year, and there was local disagreement over whether to repair or replace it. The following is found in the minutes of the April 1857 session of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions ("Court"):<br><br>Ordered commission to be appointed to consider the propriety of repairing the Court House and to report the best plan of proceeding for the public convenience in regard to the courthouse and to procure and exhibit a plan or plans of alternative or repairs with the probable cost. Commission -- Wm. Long, N. M. Lewis, Daniel S. Price, Joseph S. Totten, Calvin Graves, Benjamin F. Standfield, Bluford W. Cooper, John Cobb and Wagstaff Maynard. Ordered that they have leave to employ architect to aid in preparing a plan.<br><br>This commission wasted no time and persuaded the Court that a new building was preferred over making repairs to the old courthouse. In its July 1857 session, the Court made the following order:<br><br>Ordered by the Court that a new Court House shall be built and that the old one be disposed of by the Commissioners herein appointed to the best advantage to aid in the erection of the new court house. Following persons appointed as commissioners for new building: S. P. Hill, Wm. Long, E. K. Withers, C. H. Richmond, and N. M. Lewis to employ an architect and contract for the building of the said Court House and they are also empowered and authorized to purchase a lot or piece of land if in their opinion it is necessary on which to build the new court house.<br><br>However, the membership of this commission soon was changed to add John Cobb, Wagstaff Maynard, and Dr. Nathaniel M. Roan. And, in October 1858, C. N. B. Evans was paid $4.50 for "publishing the letting of the building of the new court house." Presumably, this had something to do with the construction of the new building. Dr. Nathaniel M. Roan became chairman of the commission. His goal of purchasing a chandelier from England for the center of the courtroom was never realized, being interrupted by the Civil War. The interior furnishings of the courthouse were not completed until the 1870s.<br><br>In April 1859 the Court directed the County Treasurer to pay all drafts drawn by the "commission who have charge of building of [the] court house in payment of expenses and charges of said building" and that the County Treasurer be reimbursed for all such sums already paid. A similar order was issued in July 1859. Construction of the new courthouse was underway, and miscellaneous bills had to be paid. And, of course, taxes were levied to pay for the new structure.<br><br>At the July 1861 term of the Court, County Trustee Thomas D. Johnston reported a payment of $200 to William Percival, architect, and a payment of "about $25,000" to David McKnight of Greensboro, the contractor who built the courthouse. McKnight was a mason by trade and would have been around fifty years old in 1861.<br><br>It also appears that the Yanceyville post office had been housed in one of the rooms of the courthouse, because the Court in that same July 1861 session "ordered and directs that the Post Office shall no longer be kept in any of the rooms of the Court House and that the same shall be removed and the sheriff of said county is hereby directed to notify Alex McAlpin of this order by serving a copy of this order on him." Presumably, McAlpin was the postmaster. The same Court also appointed James L. McKee "to keep and take care of Court House and to attend to the keeping of the public clock in order for 1 year," for which he was to be paid $50.<br><br>While not related to the new courthouse, the in July 1861 the Court also appointed a committee "to aid and provide for the families of such soldiers as have volunteered to serve in the War against Abe Lincoln's scoundrels."<br><br>What became of the old courthouse structure is not known, but some believe that parts (such as windows and doors) were incorporated into various houses built in Yanceyville, especially the Roan House remodeling.<br><br>Until 1868, North Carolina counties were governed by the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, which was composed of justices. As few as three apparently made a quorum. And, the minutes of the Caswell County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions show from three to thirty-five justices assembled quarterly for a five-day session to transact county business and to act as an inferior court. In 1868, the North Carolina constitution was amended to vest county government in a board of county commissioners.
 
  
 
== Places/Localities  ==
 
== Places/Localities  ==

Revision as of 18:13, 18 March 2012

Caswell County, North Carolina
Map
Map of North Carolina highlighting Caswell County
Location in the state of North Carolina
Map of the U.S. highlighting North Carolina
Location of North Carolina in the U.S.
Facts
Founded 1777
County Seat Yanceyville
Courthouse
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United States  Gotoarrow.png  North Carolina  Gotoarrow.png  Caswell County

History of Caswell County

Overview

An Overview of the History of Caswell County, North Carolina

Parent County

Caswell was created 8 April 1777 from Orange County. Originally, the county seat was at Leasburg. When Person County was created from the eastern half of Caswell County in 1792, the county seat was moved to what today is Yanceyville.

Boundary Changes

Caswell County was created in 1777 from the northern portion of Orange County. In 1792, the eastern half of Caswell County became Person County. No further boundary changes have been made since 1792.

Record Loss

Some records may have been destroyed during occupation by militia troops during reconstruction.

Caswell County Courthouse

History of the Historic Caswell County, North Carolina Courthouse

Places/Localities

Populated Places

Caswell County comprises nine townships: Anderson, Dan River, Hightowers, Leasburg, Locust Hill, Milton, Pelham, Stoney Creek, and Yanceyville. Major communties are: Leasburg, Milton, and Yanceyville (with Milton and Yanceyville being the only incorporated towns in the county).

Neighboring Counties

Resources

Bible Records

Bible Records (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Business records and commerce

Business records and commerce (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Cemeteries

Cemetery Census: Caswell County


Cemeteries (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Census

1786 Census (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Churches

Churches of Caswell County

Church history (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Church records (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

BAPTIST
  • Lynches Creek Primitive Baptist Church, Hightowers Township, Caswell County, North Carolina. See FHL catalog.
  • Baylock, John Burch. Prospect Hill Primitive Baptist Church records, Hightowers Township, Caswell County, North Carolina. See FHL catalog.
  • Baylock, John Burch. Bush Arbor Primitive Baptist Church records in Anderson Township, Caswell County, North Carolina. See FHL catalog.
  • Baylock, John Burch.Country Line Primitive Baptist Church records in Yanceyville Township, Caswell County, North Carolina. See FHL catalog.


Court

  • Historical Abstracts of Minutes of Caswell County, North Carolina 1777-1877, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1976).

Divorce records (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Family History


Genealogy (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Church history (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.


Bibliography

Land

Grants
  • An Index to the Caswell county, North Carolina Land Grants is found in Katharine Kerr Kendall's book Caswell County North Carolina : Land Grants, Tax Lists, State Census, Apprentice Bonds, Estate Records. See World Cat or Google Books or FHL US/CAN Book 975.6 A1 no. 125.

To effectively use grants in your research you will need to understand the North Carolina land grant proceedure.

Deeds
  • [1777-1817] Kendall, Katharine Kerr. Caswell County North Carolina Deed Books v. 1 1777-1817. (Easley, South Carolina: Historical Press, c 1989). FHL US/CAN Book 975.6575 R28k v. 1.
  • [1817-1840] Kendall, Katharine Kerr. Caswell County North Carolina Deed Books v. 2 1817-1840. (Easley, South Carolina: Historical Press, c 1989). FHL US/CAN Book 975.6575 R28k v. 2.

Land and property (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

The Caswell County Historical Assoication's Dower Rights blog article will help you determine whether a wife should be releasing her dower in a given deed.

Upon obtaining a deed or grant for your ancestor that mentions a creek or a branch, you may have a desire to locate where that creek or branch is located. TopoZone's "Toppgraphic Map Stream Features in Caswell County, North Carolina" will give you the lat and long cordinates.

Local Histories

Bibliography

An Inventory of Historic Architecture: Caswell County, North Carolina, Ruth Little-Stokes and Tony P. Wrenn (1979).

Caswell County in the World War, 1917-1918: Service Records of Caswell County Men, George A. Anderson (1921).

From Rabbit Shuffle to Collins Hill: Stories of Southern Caswell County, North Carolina, Millard Quentin Plumblee (1984)

In the Beginning . . . The Churches of Caswell County, Jean B. Scott, Compiler (2000)

Service Record Book of Men and Women of Yanceyville, N.C., and Community, Sponsored by the V.F.W. Post No. 7316 (1947-1949).

The Heritage of Caswell County, North Carolina, Jeannine D. Whitlow, Editor (1985).

When the Past Refused to Die: A History of Caswell County North Carolina 1777-1977, William S. Powell (1977).

Dwellings (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Maps

Caswell County Historical Association. Maps and/or Maps of Caswell County.

Maps (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Military

Military history (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Military records (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Civil War

Civil War Confederate units - Brief history, counties where recruited, etc.

-5th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry
-6th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry
WWI (1914-1918)

WWI (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Newspapers

Orphans and orphanages

Orphans and orphanages (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Probate

Wills
  • [1777-1799] "Caswell County, North Carolina - Wills 1777-1799"
    [1777-1814]Caswell County North Carolina Will Books 1777-1814 Katharine Kerr Kendall (1979).
  • [1814-1843] Caswell County North Carolina Will Books 1814-1843, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1983).
  • [1843-1868] Caswell County North Carolina Will Books 1843-1868, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1986).
  • Caswell County North Carolina Will Books 1777-1814, 1784 Tax List and Guardians' Accounts 1794-1819, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1979).
Estate Packets

 For estate packets, the place to start is Caswell County North Carolina : Land Grants, Tax Lists, State Census, Apprentice Bonds, Estate Records by Katherine Kerr Kendall. This book has an alphabetical index to the Caswell county, North Carolina estate packets. The index to estate packets starts on page 57. Note that there is NOT a general index in the back of this book. FHL US/CAN Book  975.6 A1 no. 125.

The original records are at the Department of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Probate records (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Guardianship (microfilmed originals or published transcripts) are listed in the FamilySearch Library Catalog for Caswell County, North Carolina Genealogy. For other libraries (local and national) or to gain access to items of interest, see  Some of the microfilms may be available at the state archives and also at the state and county historical societies.

Taxation

Vital Records

  • Caswell County, North Carolina Marriage Bonds, 1778-1868, Katharine Kerr Kendall (1981).

Societies and Libraries

Family History Centers

Web Sites

References