Difference between revisions of "Castle Gate, Utah"

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(Suggested Reading: added references)
(Suggested Reading)
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*''The Historical Guide to Utah Ghost Towns.'' <ref> Carr, Stephen L. ''The Historical Guide to Utah Ghost Towns.'' Salt Lake City, Utah: Western Epics, 1972. Film: {{FHL|78162}} Book: {{FHL|979.2 H2cr}} {{WorldCat|595478}}. </ref>
 
*''The Historical Guide to Utah Ghost Towns.'' <ref> Carr, Stephen L. ''The Historical Guide to Utah Ghost Towns.'' Salt Lake City, Utah: Western Epics, 1972. Film: {{FHL|78162}} Book: {{FHL|979.2 H2cr}} {{WorldCat|595478}}. </ref>
 
*''Some Dreams Die: Utah's Ghost Towns and Lost Treasures'' <ref>Thompson, George A; ''Some Dreams Die: Utah's Ghost Towns and Lost Treasures'' {{WorldCat|9202286}} {{FHL|979.2 H2tg}}</ref>
 
*''Some Dreams Die: Utah's Ghost Towns and Lost Treasures'' <ref>Thompson, George A; ''Some Dreams Die: Utah's Ghost Towns and Lost Treasures'' {{WorldCat|9202286}} {{FHL|979.2 H2tg}}</ref>
*''A Struggle for Survival and Identity: Families in the Aftermath of the Castle Gate Mine Disaster'' <ref>Costa, Janeen Arnold; ''A Struggle for Survival and Identity: Families in the Aftermath of the Castle Gate Mine Disaster'' {{WorldCat|363568375}} </ref>
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*''Pioneers of Carbon County'' <ref>Jean S Greenwood; Lou Jean S Wiggins; Mary N Porter Harris; Daughters of Utah Pioneers; ''Pioneers of Carbon County'' {{Worldcat| 46707885}} </ref>
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.*''A Struggle for Survival and Identity: Families in the Aftermath of the Castle Gate Mine Disaster'' <ref>Costa, Janeen Arnold; ''A Struggle for Survival and Identity: Families in the Aftermath of the Castle Gate Mine Disaster'' {{WorldCat|363568375}} </ref>
 
*''Hecatomb at Castle Gate, Utah, March 8, 1924'' <ref>Norarianni, Philip F; ''Hecatomb at Castle Gate, Utah, March 8, 1924'' {{WorldCat|367617718}} </ref>
 
*''Hecatomb at Castle Gate, Utah, March 8, 1924'' <ref>Norarianni, Philip F; ''Hecatomb at Castle Gate, Utah, March 8, 1924'' {{WorldCat|367617718}} </ref>
  

Revision as of 22:56, 10 July 2011

United States Gotoarrow.png Utah Gotoarrow.png Cache County Gotoarrow.png Castle Gate

Quick History

CastleGate.jpg
Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject: Castle Gate, Utah
Castle Gate is a mining ghost town, in Carbon County.[1] The name of the town was inspired by the large rock formation at the mouth the Price Canyon. There were two Castle Gate mines, Castle Gate #1 in 1888 [2] and Castle Gate #2 in 1912. On March 8, 1924 exploded killing 172 miners. This is one of the most deadly mining disasters in United States History. Castle Gate was closed and it's residents were relocated to a new subdivision at the mouth of Spring Canyon, west of Helper. The former townsite was cleared by May 1974.

Location

  • Coordinates: 39°43′40″N 110°52′03″W

Maps

Neighboring Communities

Nolan | Helper | Scofield |

Time Line

  • 1942: Railroad tracks removed for WWII war effort

Biographies

Cemeteries

Check cemeteries in neighboring communities.

Church Records

Historical Newspapers

1915 - 1932

Societies, Museums and Libraries

Vital Records

Birth

Marriages

Death

Nationalities of the 171 men killed in the Gastle Gate #2 explosion: [3]

  • 76 Americans
  • 49 were Greeks
  • 22 were Italians
  • 12 Welsh
  • 8 Japanese
  • 7 English
  • 6 Austrians (Yogoslavs)
  • 2 African-Americans
  • 2 Scots
  • 1 Belgian

The youngest victim was 15 years old and the oldest was 73.

Due to reduce orders, Utah Fuel Company Two weeks prior to the explosion laid off many of the unmarried miners and miners without dependents. 114 of the men who were killed in the disaster were married, leaving behind 415 widows and fatherless children.

  • Utah Department of Archives 1903 to 50 years ago
    Choices of search types - name, date of death (year, month, day, or any combination) and county.
    Images of actual death certificates.
  • Utah Death Certificates 1904 - 1956 -A free internet access to the 1904-1956 death certificates can be viewed on the Family Search Historical Records.  Utah requires a death certificate before a burial is completed.  A death certificate may contain information as to the name of the deceased, date of death, and place of death, as well as the age, birthdate, parents, gender, marital status, spouse and place of residence.  For information on death prior to 1904 you can search the Utah State Burial Index.
Obituaries

Suggested Reading

  • Connecting the West : historic railroad stops and stage stations of Elko County, Nevada [4]
  • The Historical Guide to Utah Ghost Towns. [5]
  • Some Dreams Die: Utah's Ghost Towns and Lost Treasures [6]
  • Pioneers of Carbon County [7]

.*A Struggle for Survival and Identity: Families in the Aftermath of the Castle Gate Mine Disaster [8]

  • Hecatomb at Castle Gate, Utah, March 8, 1924 [9]

Websites

Sources and Footnotes

  1. Carr, Stephen L. The Historical Guide to Utah Ghost Towns. Salt Lake City, Utah: Western Epics, 1972. Film: FHL 78162 Book: FHL 979.2 H2cr WorldCat 595478.
  2. Utah Fuels the West
  3. Castle Mine Disaster
  4. Hall, Shawn; Connecting the West : historic railroad stops and stage stations of Elko County, Nevada WorldCat 50926294
  5. Carr, Stephen L. The Historical Guide to Utah Ghost Towns. Salt Lake City, Utah: Western Epics, 1972. Film: FHL 78162 Book: FHL 979.2 H2cr WorldCat 595478.
  6. Thompson, George A; Some Dreams Die: Utah's Ghost Towns and Lost Treasures WorldCat 9202286 FHL 979.2 H2tg
  7. Jean S Greenwood; Lou Jean S Wiggins; Mary N Porter Harris; Daughters of Utah Pioneers; Pioneers of Carbon County 46707885/editions WorldCat 46707885
  8. Costa, Janeen Arnold; A Struggle for Survival and Identity: Families in the Aftermath of the Castle Gate Mine Disaster WorldCat 363568375
  9. Norarianni, Philip F; Hecatomb at Castle Gate, Utah, March 8, 1924 WorldCat 367617718