British Columbia Naturalization and Citizenship

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Prior to 1947, people born in Canada were British subjects. Anyone born in the United Kingdom or another Commonwealth country was similarly a British subject, and retained that status when he or she moved to Canada.  Aliens could become British subjects through naturalization.

The Canadian Citizenship Act, which came into force on January 1, 1947 was the first naturalization statute to introduce Canadian citizenship as an entity independent from British subject status.

Naturalization and citizenship are federal matters, but are administered by provincial courts on behalf of the federal government. The process of becoming naturalized or obtaining citizenship generates many documents and records, including correspondence, applications, oaths of residence and allegiance, and indexes created by court registries.

Because naturalization and citizenship are shared by the federal and provincial governments, records are found at both the British Columbia Archives'''' and at Citizenship and Immigration Canada'. A database of historic naturalization information is available on the Library and Archives Canada w'ebsite.

BC Archives

675 Belleville Street
Victoria, BC V8W 9W2
Internet: http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/index.htm

Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Public Rights Administration
360 Laurier Ave West
10th Floor
Ottawa, ON
K1A 1L1
Internet: http://www.collectionscanada.ca/genealogy/022-505.003-e.html

Library and Archives Canada
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/

Department of Citizenship and Immigration
Public Rights Administration
300 Slater Street, Third Floor, Section D
Ottawa, ON K1A 1L1
CANADA
http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/atip/factsheet.html

Additional Information
The following site is primarily related to Chinese-Canadian immigration.  It also contains useful general information.
Internet: http://www.vpl.ca/ccg/Naturalization.html