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User:LindaHawleyAuthor/Sandbox/Northern Ireland, Tithe Applotment Books and Indexes (FamilySearch Historical Records)

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Northern Ireland

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This article describes a collection of records scheduled to become available at FamilySearch.org.
Northern Ireland, Ireland
Saint Patrick's Saltire.png
St. Patrick's Saltire (1783-1801)
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Flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Ireland (1801-1922); Flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland (1922-present)
Flag of Ireland.png
Flag of the Republic of Ireland (1922-present)
Location of Northern Ireland, Ireland
IE Locator Map Ireland in Europe.jpg
Record Description
Record Type Tithe Applotment Books
Collection years 1814-1855
FamilySearch Resources
Related Websites
Archive
[ https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni Public Record Office of Northern Ireland]


What is in This Collection?[edit | edit source]

This collection consists of tax records for what is now Northern Ireland from the years 1822-1837. The records were originally filmed at the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

The Tithe Applotment books were compiled to determine the amount of tithes (tax) to be paid to the Church of Ireland by those who occupied agricultural lands. In 1823, the Composition Act was passed in Ireland, requiring that the tithes owed to the Established Church (the Church of Ireland) were to be paid in money. These tithes were a tax on agricultural land and had previously been payable in kind. As a result, it was necessary to have a valuation or assessment of each civil parish in the entire country to determine how much would be payable by each landholder.

Books listing tithe-payers and quantities of land were compiled for most parishes and generally ranged between the years 1823 to 1838. The books were first deposited with the Irish Land Commission, and then in the 1940s they were transferred to the Public Record Office of Ireland and the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland. The books list about 40 percent of families heads. The books are either handwritten on pre-printed pages or handwritten using the same format as the pre-printed pages.

Because most pre-1901 census records of Ireland have been destroyed, the Tithe Applotment Books are an important substitute. Although the books do not have a complete list of householders and residents, they are the only countrywide survey for the time period. In addition, they generally name individuals of lower economic status who carried the heaviest burden of tithes and about whom there are few other records.

Image Visibility[edit | edit source]

Whenever possible, FamilySearch makes images of digitized records available for all users. However, the rights to view images on this website are ultimately granted by the record custodians. Due to their restrictions, the records in this collection are not allowed to be displayed in any electronic format, and therefore are not available for viewing online.

For additional information about image restrictions, please see the Restrictions for Viewing Images in FamilySearch Historical Record Collections page.

What Can This Collection Tell Me?[edit | edit source]

The following list indicates potential information provided in these records. It must be remembered that every record may not provide all the listed information.

Tithe applotment books generally contain:

  • Townland name
  • Landholders’ names
  • Amount of land held
  • Amount to be paid in tithes
  • Landlord’s name
  • Assessment of the economic productivity of the land

How Do I Search the Collection?[edit | edit source]

Before beginning a search in these records, it is best to know the full name of the individual in question, as well as an approximate time range for the desired record. When entered into the search engine on the Collection Page, this information provides the quickest, most reliable path to finding the correct person. Of course, other information can be substituted as necessary.

Search the Index[edit | edit source]

You will be able to search this collection when it is published.

How Do I Analyze the Results?[edit | edit source]

Compare each result from your search with what you know to determine if there is a match. This may require viewing multiple records or images. Keep track of your research in a research log.

What Do I Do Next?[edit | edit source]

I Found the Person I Was Looking for, What Now?[edit | edit source]

  • Make sure to fully transcribe and cite the record entry for future reference; see below for assistance in citing this collection.
  • Use the information which has been discovered to find the individual in other records.
  • Continue to search the index to identify children, siblings, parents, and other relatives.

I Can’t Find the Person I’m Looking for, What Now?[edit | edit source]

  • When looking for a person with a common name, look at all the entries for the name before deciding which individual is correct. Use other information, such as place of birth, age, occupation, or names of parents, to determine which candidate is the correct person. If listed, a personal title may be a clue to property ownership or occupation.
  • Check for variants of given names and surnames. For much of the period of this collection, spelling was not standardized; pay special attention to how the name should have been pronounced and try variations on the pronunciation. Simple clerical errors were also always possible. Furthermore, individuals were often listed under a middle name, nickname, or abbreviation of their given name. For women, remember that it was not uncommon to revert to a maiden name after the death of a husband.
  • Vary the search terms. For example, search by either the given name or surname to return broader list of possible candidates which can then be examined for matches.
  • Search the records of bordering counties. While it was uncommon for an individual in this period to move more than about 20 miles from their place of birth, smaller relocations were not uncommon.

Research Helps[edit | edit source]

The following articles will help you in your research for your family in Northern Ireland.

Known Issues with This Collection[edit | edit source]

For a full list of all known issues associated with this collection see the attached Wiki article. If you encounter additional problems, please email them to support@familysearch.org. Please include the full path to the link and a description of the problem in your e-mail. Your assistance will help ensure that future reworks will be considered.

Citing this Collection[edit | edit source]

Citations help you keep track of places you have searched and sources you have found. Identifying your sources helps others find the records you used.

Collection Citation:
A citation will be available on the Collection Details page when the collection is published.
Record Citation:
When looking at a record, the citation is found below the record.
Image Citation:
When looking at an image, the citation is found on the Information tab at the bottom left of the screen.

How Can I Contribute to the FamilySearch Wiki?[edit | edit source]

We welcome user additions to FamilySearch Historical Records wiki articles. We are looking for additional information that will help readers understand the topic and better use the available records. We also need translations for collection titles and images in articles about records written in languages other than English. For specific needs, please visit WikiProject FamilySearch Records.

Please follow these guidelines as you make changes. Thank you for any contributions you may provide.