United Church of Christ in the United States

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United States  Gotoarrow.png  Church Records Gotoarrow.png  United Church of Christ Church Records

History in the United States[edit | edit source]

Pleasant Hill United Church of Christ
Pleasant Hill, Ohio

Finding Aids[edit | edit source]

  • Amistad Research Center, United Church of Christ records and related holdings. Amistad Research Center, Tulane University, 1990. Worldcat entry.

Finding the Records[edit | edit source]

Look for online records.[edit | edit source]

Some records have been digitized and posted online, where they are easily searched. More are being added all the time. Partner websites such as Ancestry.com, FindMyPast, MyHeritage, and American Ancestors can be searched free-of-charge at any Family History Center.

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Online databases are incomplete. This can lead to two common errors:

  1. Near matches: Researchers might mistakenly accept an entry very similar to their ancestor, thinking it is the only one available "so it must be mine". Only use information that matches your ancestor in date, place, other relationships, and details.
  2. Stopping research: Researchers might assume the database proves church records do not exist. Actually the record is still out there, just not in this incomplete collection of records. Keep searching!

Look for digital copies of church records listed in the FamilySearch Catalog.[edit | edit source]

Family History Library
Salt Lake City, Utah
  • There are many entries of United Church of Christ church records listed in the FamilySearch Catalog:
  • Online church records can be listed in the FamilySearch Catalog state-wide, county-wide, or for a town.
  • If you find a record that has not yet been digitized, see How do I request that a microfilm be digitized?
  • Some records might have viewing restrictions, and can only be viewed at a Family History Center near you, and/or by members of supporting organizations.


  • To find records statewide records:
a. Enter your state name in the "Place" search field of FamilySearch Catalog. You will see a list of topics and, at the top, the phrase "Places within United States, [STATE]".
b. Click on "Church records" in the topic list. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
  • To find county-wide records:
c. From the original page, click on Places within United States, [STATE] and a list of counties will appear.
d. Click on your county.
e. Click on the "Church records" topic. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
  • To find town records:
f. From the list of counties, click on Places within United States, [STATE], [COUNTY] and a list of towns will appear.
g. Click on your town if it appears, or the location which you believe was the parish which served your town or village.
h. Click on the "Church records" topic. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
i. Some combination of these icons will appear at the far right of the listing for the record. FHL icons.png. The magnifying glass indicates that the record is indexed. Clicking on the magnifying glass will take you to the index. Clicking on the camera will take you to an online digital copy of the records.

Correspond with or visit the actual churches.[edit | edit source]

Some records are still held in the local churches. Contact the current minister to find out what records are still available.

  • Make an appointment to look at the records. Or ask the minister of the church to make a copy of the record for you.
  • To find church staff available, you might have to visit on Sunday.
  • Ask for small searches at a time, such as one birth record or a specific marriage. Never ask for "everything on a family or surname".
  • A donation ($25-$40) for their time and effort to help you would be appropriate.
  • If the church has a website, you may be able to e-mail a message.
  • See the Letter Writing Guide for Genealogy for help with composing letters.

Address lists:

Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island Conferences of the United Church of Christ have joined to form the Southern New England Conference.

Check the church records collections in archives and libraries.[edit | edit source]

(The merger of the Evangelical and German Reformed churches and some Congregational churches in 1957 means that records may be the archives of any of the three denominations.)

Evangelical and Reformed Historical Society and Archives
555 West James Street
Lancaster, PA 17603
Telephone: 717-290-8711 or 717-393-0654


Congregational Library and Archives

Congregational Library and Archives
Congregational Christian Historical Society
14 Beacon Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02108
Phone: 617-523-0470
Hours: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.


Connecticut Conference of the United Church of Christ
125 Sherman Street
Hartford, CT 06105

Toll Free in CT: 866.367.2822; 860.233.5564
Archivist Telephone: 860-767-1004; 860-761-7105
E-mail: vaneppsj@sneucc.org
Archivist collects, preserves, organizes and maintains the historic Connecticut Conference's archival collection. This includes an extensive library, the records of the churches and clergy, publications and other information. The archivist assists researchers and scholars in the use of the Archives, and answers inquiries regarding the histories of the Conference and its 250+ churches.


Lancaster Theological Seminary
Lancaster, Pennsylvania

Lancaster Theological Seminary Library
555 West James Street
Lancaster, PA 17603

Toll Free: (800) 393-0654
Local: (717) 393-0654
Fax: (717) 393-4254

The official archives of the United Church of Christ.


Carefully compare any record you find to known facts about the ancestor[edit | edit source]

You will possibly find many different people with the same name as your ancestor, especially when a family stayed in a locality for several generations, and several children were named after the grandparents or aunts and uncles. Be prepared to find the correct church records by gathering in advance as many of these exact details about the ancestor as possible:

  • name, including middle name and maiden name
  • names of all spouses, including middle and maiden name
  • exact or closely estimated dates of birth, marriage, and death
  • names and approximate birthdates of children
  • all known places of residence
  • occupations
  • military service details


Dark thin font green pin Version 4.pngCarefully evaluate the church records you find to make sure you have really found records for your ancestor and not just a "near match". If one or more of the details do not line up, be careful about accepting the entry as your ancestor. There are guiding principles for deciding how to resolve discrepancies between records that are seemingly close. For more instruction in evaluating evidence, read the Wiki article, Evaluate the Evidence.