T genealogical glossary terms

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Tabellion[edit | edit source]
  • A French term for scrivener, a person who prepares wills and other documents. A tabellion has less training than a notairs (notary) or avocat (lawyer).
Tables décennales[edit | edit source]
  • A French index that covers ten years of a particular set of records. French civil registration records have ten-year indexes. The English translation for these indexes is ten-year indexes.
Taufen[edit | edit source]
  • The German word for baptisms.
Tax[edit | edit source]
  • Money that a government collects from individuals, businesses, and other institutions under its jurisdiction.
Tax abatement record[edit | edit source]
  • A record that lists names of individuals seeking a tax deferment. It lists the reason for the request and may also list names of relatives or guardians.
Tax records[edit | edit source]
  • A general term referring to all documents created as a result of taxation.
Tax sale record[edit | edit source]
  • A record created when the property of a person who was delinquent in paying property taxes is sold to pay the taxes.
Tax, PERiodical Source Index[edit | edit source]
  • A record type used in the Locality and Research Methodologies sections of the PERiodical Source Index (PERSI) to identify articles that contain information about tax records.
Taxation, FamilySearch Catalog™[edit | edit source]
  • A subject heading used in the FamilySearch Catalog to categorize tax records.
Taxation, general[edit | edit source]
  • The process of a government gathering money from its citizens to meet its operating expenses.
Telephone directory[edit | edit source]
  • A list of the names, addresses, and telephone numbers of people in an area.
Tellico land grants[edit | edit source]
  • Grants for lands ceded in 1805 to the United States government by the Cherokee Native Americans.
Temple ordinance, Latter-day Saint[edit | edit source]
  • A religious ceremony performed in a temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by one having priesthood authority.
Temple recommend, Latter-day Saint[edit | edit source]
  • A certificate given to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints that certifies their worthiness to enter a temple.
Temple record, Latter-day Saint[edit | edit source]
  • A record of an ordinance performed in a temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
Temple Records Index Bureau[edit | edit source]
  • A card index to Latter-day Saint temple ordinances performed between 1842 and 1970 for living and deceased individuals. The information from these records is now available in the International Genealogical Index®.
Temple work, Latter-day Saint[edit | edit source]
  • A term used in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to refer to ordinances performed in the temple.
TempleReady™[edit | edit source]
  • A computer program that helps members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints prepare the names of their ancestors for temple ordinances.
Ten-year index, France[edit | edit source]
  • An index that covers ten years of a particular set of records. French civil registration records have ten-year indexes, called tables décennales.
Tente en el aire[edit | edit source]
  • A term used in Catholic Church registers to describe a person from Spanish-speaking Latin America whose ancestry is Indian, African, and Caucasian. Racial classifications were often based on physical appearance or social status; therefore, they were not always accurate.
Terminology[edit | edit source]
  • The terms (jargon) used in a field of study.
Territorial army, British[edit | edit source]
  • British forces marshaled in other countries.
Territorial census[edit | edit source]
  • A count and description of the population of a territory.
Territorial probate court[edit | edit source]
  • A court that had probate jurisdiction over the Nevada Territory. It was established in 1861 and abolished in 1864, when Nevada became a state.
Territorial records[edit | edit source]
  • Records, such as land records, kept by a territorial government.
Territory of Hawaii[edit | edit source]
  • A territory created in 1900 that consisted of all of the present-day state of Hawaii. At that time, all citizens of Hawaii became citizens of the United States. Hawaii was made a state in March 1959.
Territory of Orleans[edit | edit source]
  • A division of Louisiana created when the United States divided the Louisiana Purchase along the 33rd parallel. The District of Louisiana was the land to the north, and the Territory of Orleans was the area to the south.
Territory, United States[edit | edit source]
  • An area in the United States that is not within the limits of any state. The residents are citizens of the United States. A territory does not have equal power with states in the federal government. The first territory established was the Northwest Territory. This territory set the pattern for how all future territories would operate. Congress established a territory and appointed a governor, a secretary, and three judges to govern it. When the population reached 5,000 adult males, the territory could choose a legislature and send a delegate to Congress. This delegate could introduce bills and participate in debate but could not vote. A territory could apply for statehood when its total population grew to 60,000.
Testament[edit | edit source]
  • A legal document that describes how a person's real and personal property should be distributed after his or her death.
  • Under early English law, a will described how an individual’s real property (lands and buildings) would be distributed after death. Since the Crown technically owned all land and buildings, a specific set of laws applied to its distribution. A testament distributed the person's personal property, such as furniture, belongings, crops, debts, and so forth.
  • The term will eventually came to mean both a will and a testament.
Testament, French[edit | edit source]
  • The French word for will, which is a legal document that describes how an individual’s real and personal property should be distributed after his or her death.
Testamentary bond[edit | edit source]
    • A written statement wherein the executor of a will guarantees that he or she will faithfully perform the tasks assigned by the probate court.

Testamentos: ===== The Spanish term for wills. =====

Testate[edit | edit source]
  • The state of an individual’s estate when he or she dies and has left a will.
Testator[edit | edit source]
  • The person who writes or dictates in another (usually a lawyer), his or her wishes regarding the dispostiion of their property after he or she died.
Testimony[edit | edit source]
  • Information given in a court by a competent witness. Evidence, on the other hand, is derived from documents, artifacts, and other sources.
Textual Reference Branch[edit | edit source]
  • The branch of the National Archives from which a researcher can obtain copies of land case files.
Thane[edit | edit source]
  • In Scotland, a minor noble who acted as an official of the Crown with certain fiscal, and later judicial, authority over a tract of land.  The status was ultimately turned into that of a baron [see definition] under the Feudal system.
The Atlantic Canadians 1600-1900[edit | edit source]
  • An Alphabetized Directory of the People, Places, and Vital Dates: An index to people from the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick who are listed in many published biographies, cemetery records, census records, directories, family histories, Loyalist listings, marriage records, and vital records in newspapers.
The Central Canadians 1600-1900[edit | edit source]
  • An Alphabetized Directory of the People, Places, and Vital Dates: An index to people from the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Manitoba who are listed in many published biographies, cemetery records, census records, directories, family histories, Loyalist listings, marriage records, and vital records in newspapers.
The Church in Wales[edit | edit source]
  • The Church of England (Anglican Church) in Wales.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints[edit | edit source]
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The usage of "Mormon" and "LDS" on this page is approved according to current policy.


  • A church restored in New York state on 6 April 1830 by Joseph Smith. The Latter-day Saints believe that after Christ’s apostles died, the world fell into a great period of apostasy. Then in the spring of 1820, when Joseph Smith prayed to know which church he should join, God the Father and his Son, Jesus Christ, revealed to him that none of the churches on the earth had the complete truth. The fulness of the gospel was now to be restored. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints accepts the Bible to be the word of God as far as it is translated correctly and also accepts the Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants, and Pearl of Great Price as scripture. Early Latter-day Saint settlements were established in Kirtland, Ohio; central western Missouri; and Nauvoo, Illinois. Beginning in 1847 the Church migrated to and began settling the Intermountain West. By 1900 the Church had settlements in Utah, Nevada, Arizona, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, California, Mexico, and Alberta, Canada. The Church now has members worldwide.
The French Canadians 1600-1900[edit | edit source]
  • An Alphabetized Directory of the People, Places, and Vital Dates: An index to French Canadians and English-speaking residents of Québec and French Canadians from other provinces who are listed in many published biographies, cemetery records, census records, directories, family histories, Loyalist listings, marriage records, and vital records in newspapers.
The Genealogist’s Address Book[edit | edit source]
  • A guide to historical and genealogical societies in the United States.
The Henry R. Baldwin Genealogical Records, Ohio[edit | edit source]
  • A collection of church, military, cemetery, court, and family information about people from eastern Ohio from 1867 to 1913.
Theft[edit | edit source]
  • Illegally taking property without the owner’s permission.
Thirty Year's War (1618-1648)[edit | edit source]
  • A series of wars that began as a civil war between Protestants and Catholics in Germany and ended as a general struggle for territory and power involving almost every nation in Europe. The first part of the war occurred in Bohemia between 1618 and 1620 when the Archbishop of Prague ordered the destruction of a Protestant church. The Protestants revolted and removed the Catholic king and Holy Roman Emperor, Ferdinand, from the throne and put a Protestant in his place. In 1620, however, the Protestants were defeated, and Ferdinand regained the throne. The next phase of the war occurred from 1625 to 1629 when the king of Denmark, Christian IV, sent troops to oppose Ferdinand in Saxony. Once again the Protestants were defeated. From 1630 to 1635 the Swedish king, Gustavus Adolphus, entered the war. He was a devout Protestant and feared that Ferdinand was becoming too powerful. Again the Protestants were defeated. The final phase of the war lasted from 1635 to 1648. It was instigated by Cardinal Richelieu of France, who was determined to keep the Habsburg family of Austria from gaining too much power. France and its Swedish allies entered the war on the side of the Protestants. This time the Protestants won. As a result of the war, France acquired Alsace and Lorraine; Sweden gained control of the mouths of the Oder, Elbe, and Weser Rivers; Calvinism was placed on equal grounds with Lutheranism and Catholicism; and Germany was left in ruins. It took Germany nearly 200 years to recover. Many Germans left their impoverished country to immigrate to the Americas.
Three-Part Record, Latter-day Saint[edit | edit source]
  • A printed book used to record membership records of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints between 1900 and 1920. It was divided into three parts: records of baptisms, priesthood ordinations, and unbaptized children.
Tidepengebøger, Denmark[edit | edit source]
  • Records kept by Danish trade guilds. They include records of the payment of guild member dues. These are helpful for finding guild members' residences.
Tierras y aguas[edit | edit source]
  • A type of Latin American land record that contains information about land grants and water rights, correspondence, transfers of title, and similar documents.
Time period[edit | edit source]
  • A length of time between two dates or points in time; also an era of time.
Tingbog, Denmark[edit | edit source]
  • Danish court records. Danish courts recorded land ownership, sales, and transfers.
Tithable[edit | edit source]
  • An individual who is subject to a tax.
Tithe Applotment books[edit | edit source]
  • A list of people who paid taxes to the Church of Ireland between 1820 and 1840 They are arranged by parish.
Title, land[edit | edit source]
  • The right to own land; also a certificate showing ownership of land.
Title, name[edit | edit source]
  • A word or phrase attached to a person or family that signifies identification, honor, distinction, or position.
Título de propiedad[edit | edit source]
  • The Spanish word for land title, a land record in Latin America that includes information relating to land title, possession, contracts, bills of sale, buildings, or improvements. These records may also include information about the families and individuals who have owned or occupied the land.
Toleration act, general[edit | edit source]
  • A law passed by a government to allow religious freedom.
Toleration Act, New Hampshire[edit | edit source]
  • A law passed by the New Hampshire legislature in 1819 that forbade the practice of taxing state residents to support the Congregational or any other church.

Tombstone record: A transcription of a tombstone or grave marker.

Topographic map: A map showing the physical features of a piece of land.

Torna atrás[edit | edit source]
  • A term used in Catholic Church registers to describe a person from Spanish-speaking Latin America whose ancestry is Indian, African, and Caucasian. Racial classifications were often based on physical appearance or social status; therefore, they were not always accurate.
Torrens system, Canada[edit | edit source]
  • A method of recording land transactions between the British Crown and individuals. It provides the actual land titles and a registry of transactions. Manitoba, Canada, began using this system in 1885.
Tote[edit | edit source]
  • The German word for a civil death record.
Tour of duty[edit | edit source]
  • A term used to indicate the length of a person's service in the military.
Town clerk[edit | edit source]
  • A town official who keeps the vital, land, and other records of a town.
Town Clerks' Registers of Men Who Served in the Civil War, ca. 1865-1867[edit | edit source]
  • Registers containing names and vital information about men from New York who served in the Civil War. The registers are arranged by county and town.
Town court, Connecticut[edit | edit source]
  • A court in Connecticut with jurisdiction over civil matters. These courts were succeeded by the circuit courts.
Town courthouse[edit | edit source]
  • A building that houses a town’s court of law.
Town hall[edit | edit source]
  • A public building that houses offices for a town’s government or that is used for town meetings.
Town history[edit | edit source]
  • A written account of the events that took place in a town or city.
Town meeting minutes[edit | edit source]
  • A written account of the discussion and decisions made at a meeting of the residents or leaders of a town or city.
Town record, general[edit | edit source]
  • A record kept at the town, city, or village level.
Town Records, FamilySearch Catalog™[edit | edit source]
  • A subject heading used in the FamilySearch Catalog to categorize records kept by a town's government.
Townland, Ireland[edit | edit source]
  • A unit of land in Ireland that was a family holding. Townlands varied considerably in size but were on average about 350 acres. A townland is also a territorial division equivalent to a township.
Township Papers, Canada[edit | edit source]
  • A collection of miscellaneous land records for Ontario. It contains some family information mentioned in correspondence. The records are not indexed, but they are arranged by township, concession, and lot number.
Township Papers, Canada[edit | edit source]
  • A collection of miscellaneous land records for Ontario. It contains some family information mentioned in correspondence. The records are not indexed, but they are arranged by township, concession, and lot number.
Township, Canada[edit | edit source]
  • A division of a county in Ontario, Nova Scotia, eastern Québec, and a few counties in Québec along the Ottawa River. Nova Scotia quit using townships over a hundred years ago, but most of Ontario and parts of Québec still use them. Some townships had their own municipal governments, although villages and towns within their boundaries may have been independent of them. Some townships were only parcels of land. In Québec, the word township is translated as canton. The Cantons de l'Est are the Eastern Townships of Québec, which are in counties lying north of the Vermont border. In Canada's Prairie Provinces (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta) and in portions of British Columbia, townships are square blocks of land, six miles on a side. They are numbered north from the 49th parallel, which forms the boundary between Canada and the United States. Townships in western Canada never have their own governments.
Township, governmental[edit | edit source]
  • A government with jurisdiction over a 36-square-mile area.
Township, land[edit | edit source]
  • A piece of land that is six miles on each side. A township contains 36 square miles of land.
Tract book[edit | edit source]
  • The official government records that contain the legal description of a piece of land and the names of the owners. One copy is sent to the federal government, and the other is kept by the local land office.
Tract, land[edit | edit source]
  • A piece of land.
Tract, publication[edit | edit source]
  • A short book or pamphlet on a particular topic, frequently a religious subject.
Trade directory[edit | edit source]
  • An alphabetical list of persons engaged in the same trade or profession.
Trade, land[edit | edit source]
  • The buying and selling of property.
Trade, occupation[edit | edit source]
  • A skill an individual uses to earn a living.
Trail of Tears[edit | edit source]
  • An exodus that occurred in 1838 when the United States government forced the Cherokee Native Americans to move from their lands in the Southeast to the Indian Territory, west of the Mississippi. The Cherokees called this march the Trail of Tears because so many of their people died along the way.
Transcript, copy of records[edit | edit source]
  • A handwritten, typed, or printed copy of a document or set of records.
Transcript, court records[edit | edit source]
  • A verbatim, written account of the proceedings of a trial or court hearing.
Transcript, school[edit | edit source]
  • A student’s educational record.
Transfer of property[edit | edit source]
  • The changing of land ownership from one person to another after the first land grant is given.
Transfers of land between individuals[edit | edit source]
  • A land transaction that occurs after the original land grant has been issued from the government or a land company.
Transported prisoner[edit | edit source]
  • A prisoner who was deported from Great Britain to America, Australia, or the West Indies.
Trauungen[edit | edit source]
  • A German word for marriages.
Treasury warrant[edit | edit source]
  • A warrant purchased from the state for a specific amount of vacant land.
Treaty of Paris (1763)[edit | edit source]
  • The treaty that ended the Seven Years War (French and Indian War) in 1763. This treaty gave the British the French colonies of Nova Scotia (formerly Acadia) and Québec (formerly New France). Britain returned Manila in the Philippines to Spain.
Treaty of Utrecht (1713)[edit | edit source]
  • A treaty signed in 1713 to end the War of Spanish Succession (Queen Anne's War). In this treaty, Phillip was acknowledged the king of Spain; France agreed that France and Spain would never unite under one crown; and Great Britain gained the islands of Gibralter and Minorca, a contract to supply all Spanish colonies in America with slaves, and territory in Canada (the land around Hudson Bay, Newfoundland, and the Nova Scotia region of Acadia). The Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI refused to sign the treaty, claiming that he was the heir to the Spanish throne. France and Austria continued to battle until 1714, when they signed the treaties of Rastatt and Baden, which confirmed most of the terms in the Treaty of Utrecht.
Tresalvo[edit | edit source]
  • A term used in Catholic Church registers to describe a person from Spanish-speaking Latin America whose ancestry is African (1/4) and Spanish Caucasian (3/4). Racial classifications were often based on physical appearance or social status; therefore, they were not always accurate.
Trespass[edit | edit source]
  • Illegal interference with one's person, property, or rights; also illegal entrance into private buildings or land.
Trial Division of the Federal Court of Canada[edit | edit source]
  • A federal court in Canada that has jurisdiction over claims against the Crown and miscellaneous cases involving the Crown.
Trial Division, Canada[edit | edit source]
  • A division of a provincial superior or supreme court in Canada. The Trial Division hears serious civil and criminal cases and has the authority to grant divorces. Also called Court of Queen's Bench.
Tribal records[edit | edit source]
  • Records kept by tribes of Native Americans.
Trolovelse[edit | edit source]
  • A Swedish, Danish, and Norwegian word for engagement (as in engagement to be married).
Tuition[edit | edit source]
  • Guardianship over a child who is not old enough to marry.
Tuscarora[edit | edit source]
  • A powerful tribe of Native Americans who originally lived in North Carolina. Upset by white settlers who were taking their land, the Tuscarora attacked white settlements in North Carolina on 22 September 1711. This bloody war ended in the tribe's defeat. Remaining tribe members joined the Iroquois League in New York and eventually moved to Indian Territory in what is now Oklahoma.
Tutelas:[edit | edit source]
  • he Spanish term for guardianship records.
Tutelle et curatelle[edit | edit source]
  • A French term for guardianship papers. These are records about orphans and the conservation of their property.
Twin territories[edit | edit source]
  • A term that referred to both the Oklahoma and Indian Territories. These two territories were combined in 1907 to form the state of Oklahoma.
Twitchell Archives[edit | edit source]
  • Land records compiled by Ralph E. Twitchell. They cover the years 1685 to 1898 and include land disputes, appeals, grants, wills, mine claims, and judgments. The records are in both English and Spanish.