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San Pedro Ayampuc, Guatemala, Guatemala Genealogy

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Guide to Municipality of San Pedro Ayampuc ancestry, family history and genealogy: birth records, marriage records, death records, church records, parish registers, and civil registration.

History[edit | edit source]

  • The town of Ayampuc originated as a product of disputes between the Quiché and the Cakchiquel, taking the initial name of Yampuc.
  • The Spanish and Mexican forces of the conquistador Pedro de Alvarado found the inhabitants of Yampuc involved in internal wars and no longer able to continue fighting because of epidemics that the invaders themselves had inadvertently caused.
  • When the peoples were finally pacified, they were ordered to form organized and urbanized settlements in the European style, which contravened the will of the indigenous people, who were accustomed to living in a dispersed way. The conquerors found fortified settlements, and took advantage of them to establish indigenous encomiendas and doctrines.
  • On November 2, 1837, San Caballo Ayampuc was legally awarded 40 caballerias of land.
  • New measures were ordered in 1886, which measures granted a territorial extension of 93 caballerias, 9 manzanas and 9,522 square yards.
  • On November 5, 1936, they annexed to San Pedro Ayampuc populations that until then had belonged to the municipality of Guatemala.
  • The municipality of San Pedro Ayampuc has a population of approximately 45,000 people[1]

Civil Registration[edit | edit source]

Catalog English.jpg

Parish Records[edit | edit source]

  • There are no records for only the municipality of San Pedro Ayampuc. See the records of neighboring municipalities.

Census Records[edit | edit source]

  • There are no records for only the municipality of San Pedro Ayampuc. See the records of neighboring municipalities.

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

  • Cementerio de San Pedro Ayampuc

Localities[edit | edit source]

  • El Carrizal
  • Encuentro Cucajol
  • Labor Vieja
  • Lagunilla
  • Lo De Reyes
  • Los Achiotes
  • Los Vados
  • Petacá
  • San Antonio El Angel
  • San José Nacahuil

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wikipedia Collaborators, "San Pedro Ayampuc," In Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Pedro_Ayampuc. Visited 18 July 2017.