Saint David Parish, Grenada

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Saint David Parish

Guide to Saint David Parish family history and genealogy: birth records, marriage records, death records, census records, family history, and military records.

Parish of Saint David

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Contents

Saint David in the southeastern part of Grenada is the fourth largest parish on the Island covering a total area of 18 sq mi (47 km2) with its current total population standing at 11,486. It is also the only parish without a main town. Because of this it is sometimes referred to as "The Virgin Parish". It is ringed by spectacular bays and Inlets that help to provide the island with a variety of small secluded Beaches. With a rocky coastline that slopes up gently towards the central mountainous ridge called Perdmontempts, which retains its rural beauty of valleys bearing rich fruits of guava, cherries, plums, mangoes and lush sugar cane.

History

A town called Megrin was was originally established by the French during their first inhabitance during 1609 at, what is now, St David’s Point. However, it the town was destroyed during what is this is now often referred to at the Fédon Rebellion or conflict. The town itself was never rebuilt.

In the 1721 the catholic parish of Megrin was reopened by the French, but it was built further down south next to the sea.

In 1747 Megrin in St David was still considered one of the six churches and parishes in Grenada.

The parish of Saint David is most famed for its association with the Fédon conflict - once the French government had signed the Treaty of Paris on 10 February 1763 ceding the island of Grenada to the British the remaining French inhabitants on the island wrote a letter to the English king declaring their allegiance. However a small group of predominantly free mixed-race French citizens attempted an uprising to regain French control (not for the freedom of slaves as is often incorrectly ascribe to this event). Between the 2nd of March 1795 and 19th June 1796 the battle occurred in the old town of this parish between Fédon band of men and the English troops staying at the church over night.