Hawaii Schools

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History of Hawaii Schools

In 1778 Captain James Cook's arrival in Hawaii weakened tradition and order to the Hawaiian culture. Alas. Western influence arrives! Shortly after in 1820 the missionaries arrived from puritan New England and reduced the Hawaiian language to written form which enabled the Hawaiian population to read and write in their own language. By 1831 over some 52,000 people were enrolled in the schools that were established throughout the islands since the missionaries arrival [1]


Public Schools

Hawaii has the only school system within the United States that is unified statewide. Public elementary, middle, and high school test scores in Hawaii are below national averages on tests mandated under the No Child Left Behind Act. The Hawaii Board of Education requires that all eligible students take these tests and report all student test scores while other states like Texas and Michigan for example, do not. The ACT college placement tests show that in 2005, seniors scored slightly above the national average (21.9 compared with 20.9).[144] but in the widely accepted SAT examinations, Hawaii's college-bound seniors tend to score below the national average in all categories except mathematics [2]

Private Schools

Collectively, independent educational institutions of primary and secondary education have one of the highest percentages of enrollment of any state. Private schools thus educated over 17% of the students, nearly three times the approximate national average of 6%. The Kamehameha Schools are the only schools in the United States that openly grant admission to students based on ancestry, and the wealthiest schools in the United States, if not the world, having over nine billion US dollars in estate assets [3].

Colleges and Universities

The largest is the University of Hawaii System. It consists of: the research university at Mānoa; two comprehensive campuses Hilo and West Oʻahu; and seven Community Colleges.

Private universities include Brigham Young University–Hawaii, Chaminade University of Honolulu, Hawaii Pacific University, and Wayland Baptist University.

The Saint Stephen Diocesan Center is a seminary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Honolulu [4].


References


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