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Córdoba Province, Argentina Genealogy

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Guide to Province of Córdoba Province family history and genealogy: birth records, marriage records, death records, church records, parish registers, and civil registration.

Province of Cordoba

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History[edit | edit source]

  • On July 6, 1573, Jerónimo Luis de Cabrera founded the city of Córdoba in La Nueva Andalucía.
  • In 1776 it became part of the newly created Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata. Córdoba, due to its geographical location, almost in the center of the Southern Cone, was the hub of terrestrial communications between the Spanish territories located to the southeast with the Río de la Plata, and to the west with the captaincy of General of Chile and to the north with the Alto Perú
  • In 1806 the English invasions were carried out in the Río de la Plata. On June 27, the city of Buenos Aires surrendered to the British, while the army retreated to the city of Córdoba, along with a few hundred militiamen
  • Sobremonte named the city of Córdoba as the provisional capital of the viceroyalty. From Cordoba, Sobremonte began to gather forces to expel the British. The British occupation was expelled by those forces.
  • The province of Córdoba has a population of approximately 3,568,000 people. [1]

Departments[edit | edit source]

CapitalIschilínPunillaTotoralColónRío PrimeroRío SegundoSanta MaríaTercero ArribaGeneral San MartínJuárez CelmanUniónSan JustoMarcos JuárezPresidente Roque Sáenz PeñaGeneral RocaCalamuchitaRío CuartoSan JavierSan AlbertoPochoMinasCruz del EjeSobremonteRío SecoTulumbaCórdoba Province Map.png

Topicial of Córdoba Province[edit | edit source]

At the end of the 19th century the process of national industrialization began with the height of the economic agro-exporting model, principally of meats and cereals. This process is associated with the European immigration who began to settle the city, generally possessing the education and enterprising capacity appropriate for the development of industry. The majority of these European immigrants came from Italy (initially from Piedmont, Veneto and Lombardy; later from Campania and Calabria), and Spain (mostly Galicians and Basques) At the beginning of the 20th century the city had 90,000 inhabitants.[citation needed] The city changed considerably its physionomy following the construction of new avenues, walks and public squares, as well as the installation of an electrified tram system, in 1909. In 1918, Córdoba was the epicentre of a movement known as the University Reform, which then spread to the rest of the Universities of the country, Americas and Spain.[citation needed] The development of the domestic market, the British investments that facilitated European settlement, the development of the railways on the pampas rapidly industrialized the city. Córdoba's industrial sector first developed from the need to transform raw materials such as leather, meats and wool for export.[3] In 1927, the Military Aircraft Manufacturer (FMA) was inaugurated. The facility would become one of the most important in the world after World War II with the arrival of German technical personnel. From 1952, its production began to diversify, to constitute the base of the former Institute Aerotécnico, the state-owned company Aeronautical and Mechanical Industries of the State (IAME). Córdoba was chosen as the site of The Instituto Aerotécnico that later became the Fábrica Militar de Aviones. It employed the Focke Wulf men until President Juan Perón was ousted by a coup in 1955. Lockheed Martin purchased FMA in 1995. Córdoba, according to the census of 1947, had almost 400,000 inhabitants (a quarter of the province's total). Subsequent industrial development led thousands of rural families to the city, doubling its population and turning Córdoba into the second largest city in Argentina, after Buenos Aires, by 1970. The city's population and economic growth moderated, afterwards, though living standards rose with the increase in the national consumption of Córdoba's industrial products, as well as the development of other sectors of economic activity.[citation needed] At times rivaling Buenos Aires for its importance in national politics, Córdoba was the site of the initial mutiny leading to the 1955 Revolución Libertadora that deposed President Juan Perón and the setting for the 1969 Cordobazo, a series of violent labor and student protests that ultimately led to elections in 1973. Córdoba's current economic diversity is due to a vigorous services sector and the demand for agro-industrial and railway equipment and, in particular, the introduction of U.S. and European automakers after 1954.

Getting started with research in Córdoba[edit | edit source]

See FamilySearch Tutorials on Latin American Research.


Most of your genealogical research for Argentina will be in two main record types: civil registration and church records. This article will teach you methods for locating and searching these two record groups.

Civil Registration[edit | edit source]

  • Civil registration records are government records covering birth, marriage, and death. They are an excellent source of names, dates, places, and relationships.
  • Civil authorities began registering births, marriages, and deaths in 1886. Even though the law was passed in 1886 most of the provinces started keeping records at different times. Most had the system going by 1900.
  • Every municipal district was to make duplicate copies of their books. In Córdoba they kept the original books and send the copies to the Archivo General de Tribunales in the Federal District. In the provinces they were to be send the copies to the provincial or judicial archives of each province.
  • According to the law, the public has liberal access to the civil records. The director of the civil archive is required to provide interested parties with a complete copy of any record, including marginal notes, under his jurisdiction.
  • The Family History Library has not microfilmed the civil registration records of Argentina. The Library's collection continues to grow as new records are microfilmed and added to the collection from numerous sources. Don't give up if records are not available yet. The FamilySearch Catalog is updated periodically. Check it again every year for the records you need.


Locating Civil Registration Records[edit | edit source]

Civil registration records are kept at the local municipal district civil registration office (Dirección del Registro Civil). Therefore, you must determine the municipal district where your ancestor lived before you can find the records. The original book stays in the municipal office and duplicate copies are sent to the provincial or judicial archives of the province or the General Archive of the Tribunal in the federal district. Therefore, duplicates may also be available at the provincial level. If a letter to the town/city fails, write to the provincial office.

Your ancestor may have lived in a village that belonged civilly to a larger nearby town. In large cities, there may be many civil registration districts. You may need to use gazetteers and other geographic references to identify the place your ancestor lived and the civil registration office that served it. See Diccionario geográfico estadístico nacional argentino (1885). Although this gazetteer is in Spanish, the province is listed immediately after the name of the town.

Local Archives[edit | edit source]

Civil officials will generally answer correspondence in Spanish. Use the following address:

Dirección del Registro Civil
        Oficina de Inscripciones y Rectificaciones
        (*postal code) (City), (Province), Argentina

Provincial Archives and Tribunal Archives[edit | edit source]

These archives maintain the duplicates sent to them by the municipal districts. You may write to these archives and request searches of the records. The public has access to these records. For the province of Córdoba, you will need to write to the following address:

Registro Provincial de las Personas
Córdoba (Capital)
Avenida Colon 1775
Barrio Alberdi
CP 5000 Ciudad de Córdoba
Argentina
Telefono: 051-802163
Fax: 051-807346
Telefono: 051 4 80 2163

Registro Provincial de las Personas
Córdoba (Interior)
Caseros 356
CP 5000 Ciudad de Córdoba
Argentina
Telefono: 0351 43-42175
Dirección del Registro Civil de la Municipalidad de Córdoba

After deciding who has jurisdiction over the records for the time period you need, write a brief request to the proper office. Send the following:

  • Full name and the sex of the person sought.
  • Names of the parents, if known.
  • Approximate date and place of the event.
  • Your relationship to the person.
  • Reason for the request (family history, medical, etc.).
  • Request for a photocopy of the complete original record.
  • Check or cash for the search fee (usually about $10.00).

Write your request in Spanish whenever possible. For writing your letter in Spanish, use the translated questions and phrases in this Spanish Letter-writing Guide.

Church Records[edit | edit source]

The vast majority of Argentines were Catholic and were registered in the records of the local parish or diocese which are called registros parroquiales (parish registers). These records include entries for baptisms, marriage information, marriages, deaths, and burials. Often two and sometimes three generations are indicated in the records. In addition, church records may include church censuses, account books, confirmations, and other church-related records.

Church records are crucial for genealogical research, since civil authorities did not begin registering vital statistics until after 1886. After this date one should search in both church and civil records as there may be information in one that does not appear in the other. For instance the church records may only list the godparents whereas the civil records may list the grandparents.

1. Online Digital Records for Church Records[edit | edit source]

For some localities, digital copies of Catholic church records can be searched online:

Bautismos are infant baptisms, which are used for birth information. Información matrimonial are documents collected in preparation for a marriage. Matrimônios' are marriages. Defunciones are deaths. Entierros are burials'". Índice is the index.

2. Microfilm Copies of Church Records in the FamilySearch Catalog[edit | edit source]

If the locality and time period you need are not included in the online records, the next step is to find them in the microfilm collection of the Family History Library. Currently, they are being digitized, and plans are to complete that project by 2020. Check back occasionally to see if your records have become available. In the meantime, some of them might be available at a Family History Center near you.
To find a microfilm:

a. Click on this link to see a list of records for Argentina, Province of Cordoba.
b. Click on "Places within Argentina, Cordoba" and a list of towns and cities will open.
c. Click on the town or city you wish to search.
d. Click on "Church Records" topic. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
e. Choose the correct event and time period for your ancestor.
f. Some combination of these icons will appear at the far right of the microfilm listed for the record. FHL icons.png. Clicking on the magnifying glass will take you to the index. Clicking on the camera will take you to an online digital copy of the microfilm.

3. Writing to a Catholic Priest for Church Records[edit | edit source]

Baptism, marriage, and death records may be searched by contacting or visiting local parish or diocese archives in Argentina. Argentina has no single repository of church records. Write your request in Spanish whenever possible. This method is not always reliable. Officials might or might not respond.

Write a brief request in Spanish to the proper church using this address as guide replacing the information in parentheses:

Reverendo Padre
Parroquia de (name of parish)
(postal code), (city), Cordoba
Argentina


When requesting information, send the following:

  • Money for the search fee, usually $10.00
  • Full name and the sex of the ancestor sought
  • Names of the ancestor’s parents, if known
  • Approximate date and place of the event
  • Your relationship to the ancestor
  • Reason for the request (family history, medical, and so on)
  • Request for a photocopy of the complete original record


Write your request in Spanish whenever possible. For writing your letter in Spanish, use the translated questions and phrases in this Spanish Letter-writing Guide.]

Reading the Records[edit | edit source]

  • Online interactive slideshow lessons are available to help you learn to read these records:




Tips for finding your ancestor in the records[edit | edit source]

Effective use of church records includes the following strategies.

  • Search for the relative or ancestor you selected. When you find his birth record, search for the births of his brothers and sisters.
  • Next, search for the marriage of his parents. The marriage record will have information that will often help you find the birth records of the parents.
  • You can estimate the ages of the parents and determine a birth year to search for their birth records.
  • Then repeat the process for both the father and the mother.
  • If earlier generations (parents, grandparents, etc.) do not appear in the records, search neighboring parishes.
  • Search the death registers for all known family members.

Research Tools[edit | edit source]

Wiki articles describing online collections are found at:

Featured Content[edit | edit source]

Census[edit | edit source]

Tutorials[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wikipedia Collaborators, "Provincia de Córdoba (Argentina)," In Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia, https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provincia_de_C%C3%B3rdoba_(Argentina). Visited November 6, 2017.