African American Resources for New York

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Introduction[edit | edit source]

A list of resource for researching African American ancestors who lived in New York.

Online Resources[edit | edit source]

  • 1846-1867 U.S., Freedmen’s Bureau Marriage Records, 1846-1867 ($)
  • 1849-1968 New York State Colonization Society Records, 1849-1968. New York Public Library
  • 1861-1872 United States, Freedmen's Bureau Marriages, 1861-1872
  • 1865-1874 Freedman's Bank Records, 1865-1874
  • African American Digital Bookshelf - a growing list of digital books on FamilySearch and other websites
  • African American History of Western New York
  • Life Stories: Profiles of Black New Yorkers During Slavery and Emancipation
  • The African-American Migration Experience, Schomburg Center of Research in Black Culture
  • Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection
  • African American Women Writers of the 19th Century
  • Discover Freedmen - this site searches all of the Freedmen's Bureau record collections on FamilySearch altogether (and redirects there)
  • Hudson River Valley Heritage Untold Stories of the African American Presence in the Mid-Hudson Valley
  • New York Slavery Records Index (index)
  • Research Strategy[edit | edit source]

    History[edit | edit source]

    African American slavery was common in New York during the colonial period. Hoff prepared a guide for tracing African American colonists:

    • Hoff, Henry B. "Researching African-American Families in New Netherland and Colonial New York and New Jersey," The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 136, No. 2 (Apr. 2005):83-95. Digital version at New York Family History ($); FHL Book 974.7 B2n v. 136.

    A law passed 29 March 1799 declared that "any child born of a slave after the 4th of July next shall be deemed to be born free." Owners discovered a loophole to keep these children enslaved by registering them in certain counties. Such lists have been located and published for the Town of Castleton (Richmond County), Kings County, and New York County.[1]

    Several lists of manumitted slaves have been discovered and published:

    • 1659-1846 - O'Neill, Terri Bradshaw. "Manumissions and Certificates of Freedom in the New York Secretary of State Deeds," The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 139, No. 1 (Jan. 2008):72-73. Digital version at New York Family History ($); FHL Book 974.7 B2n v. 139.
    • Record of Slave Manumissions in New York During the Colonial and Early National Periods. By Harry B. Yoshpe, University of the State of New York, State Education Department, Albany. Journal of Negro History Vol. 26 January, 1941 No. 1 pages 78-107
    • 1700s-1810s - Eichholz, Alice and James M. Rose. "New York State Manumissions," The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Masters' Surnames A-B: Vol. 108, No. 4 (Oct. 1977):221-225; Masters' Surnames C-D: Vol. 109, No. 1 (Jan. 1978):22-24; Masters' Surnames E-I: Vol. 109, No. 2 (Apr. 1978):71-74; Masters' Surnames J-N: Vol. 109, No. 3 (Jul. 1978):145-149; Masters' Surnames O-S: Vol. 109, No. 4 (Oct. 1978):229-233; Masters' Surnames T-Z: Vol. 110, No. 1 (Jan. 1979):39-42. Digital version at New York Family History ($); FHL Book 974.7 B2n v. 109-110.

    Online resources:

    To learn more:

    Resources[edit | edit source]

    Biographies[edit | edit source]

    Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

    Census Records[edit | edit source]

    Church Records[edit | edit source]

    Emancipation Records[edit | edit source]

    Funeral Homes[edit | edit source]

    Genealogies[edit | edit source]

    Land and Property[edit | edit source]

    • Guide to the Wilson and Jane Rantus papers, 1834-1883. Largely bills submitted by individuals and the village and town government. Letters written to Wilson Rantus from Thomas Hamilton, pioneer black journalist, 1854-1861. Other items include insurance policies for private homes, and estate papers. Digital Archives, Queens Borough Public Library Long Island Division 89-11 Merrick Blvd., Jamaica, N.Y. 11432

    Plantation[edit | edit source]

    Oral Histories[edit | edit source]

    Other Records[edit | edit source]

    Railroad

    Military Records[edit | edit source]

    • Patriots of Color. Free database at Archives.com. Includes details about 50 black New Yorkers in the Revolutionary War.[2]

    Newspapers[edit | edit source]

    Probate Records[edit | edit source]

    Reconstruction Records[edit | edit source]

    Freedman’s Bank[edit | edit source]

    An excellent source is the Freedman’s Savings and Trust Company (visit the African American Freedman's Savings and Trust Company Records page to learn more). This company was created to assist African American soldiers of the Civil War and freed slaves. Freedman’s Savings and Trust Company signature cards or registers from 3 March 1865 to 25 July 1874 may list the name of the depositor, date of entry, age, birthplace, residence, complexion, name of employer or occupation, wife or husband’s name, death information, children’s names, name of father and mother, brothers’ and sisters’ names, remarks, and signature. Early books sometimes contained the name of the former master or mistress and the name of the plantation. Copies of death certificates were sometimes attached to the entries. The collection is organized alphabetically by state, then city where the bank was located, then date the account was established, then account number.

    Online collections of Freedman's Bank records:

    Freedmen's Bureau[edit | edit source]

    The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands was created by the US government in 1865 until 1872 to assist former slaves in the southern United States. The Bureau created a wide variety of records extremely valuable to genealogists. Such documents include censuses, marriage records, and medical records. These records often include full names, former masters and plantations, and current residences.[3] For 1865 and 1866, the section on abandoned and confiscated lands includes the names of the owners of the plantations or homes that were abandoned, confiscated, or leased. It gives the county and location, a description of the house, the number of acres owned, and the number of cabins of former slaves. These films do not appear to contain the names of former slaves.

    To find Freedmen's Bureau records:

    Other FamilySearch collections not included:

    Visit the African American Freedmen's Bureau Records page to learn more about utilizing these records.

    School Records[edit | edit source]

    Slavery Records[edit | edit source]

    Vital Records[edit | edit source]

    Birth[edit | edit source]

    Marriage[edit | edit source]

    • New York, County Marriages, 1847-1848; 1908-1936 - information may include the bride and groom’s name, residence, race, age, occupation, no. of marriage, birthplace, marital status, parents and their birthplaces, and the marriage date and place

    The Freedmen's Bureau (1865-1872) was created by the US government to assist former slaves in the southern United States. One of their responsibilities was to record the marriages (past and present) of the former slaves. These records can be found in the collections below and include the lists of marriages that occurred previously, marriage certificates, and marriage licenses. The information contained on the records may include the name of the husband and wife/groom and bride, age, occupation, residence, year or date of marriage, by whom, number of children, and remarks.

    Death[edit | edit source]

    Divorce[edit | edit source]

    Voting Registers[edit | edit source]

    Archives and Libraries[edit | edit source]

    African American Museum of Nassau County
    110 North Franklin Street
    Hempstead, New York 11550
    Email: taags.aam@gmail.com
    Phone: 516-572-0730

    New-York Historical Society Museum & Library – African Americans Archives
    170 Central Park West
    at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
    New York, NY 10024
    Phone: (212) 873-3400

    Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
    515 Malcolm X Boulevard
    New York, NY 10037-1801
    Phone: (212) 491-2200

    Cornell University
    Ithaca, NY 14853
    Carl A. Knoch Library Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections
    Samuel J. May Anti-Slavery Collection

    Societies[edit | edit source]

    Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society – New York Chapter
    Email: info@aahgs-newyork.org
    Phone: (212) 330-7882

    References[edit | edit source]

    1. Alice Eichholz and James M. Rose, "Slave Births in Castleton, Richmond County, New York," The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 110, No. 4 (Oct. 1979):196. Digital version at New York Family History ($); FHL Book 974.7 B2n v. 110.
    2. Dick Eastman, "Archives.com to Publish the Patriots of Color Database," Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter, 24 February 2012, http://blog.eogn.com/eastmans_online_genealogy/2012/02/archivescom-to-publish-the-patriots-of-color-database.html.
    3. "African American Records: Freedmen's Bureau," "African American Heritage," National Archives, accessed 11 May 2018.