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Biloxi '88; a family affair

hosted by the L.W. Anderson Genealogical Library
Books/Monographs
English
Arlington, Virginia : National Genealogical Society, 1988
iii, 476 p. : charts, maps.

Notes

With the participation of the Association of Professional Genealogists, Board for Certification of Genealogists, Council of Genealogy Columnists, International Society for British Genealogy and Family History, National Institute on Genealogical Research Alumni Association, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution.

Partial contents: Solving problems using records of collateral relatives -- Migrations from the Carolinas to the "suburbs" -- NSDAR publications as finding aids for research -- Tracing English noble and royal lines -- How to have your article accepted or rejected by the editor -- Railroads, agriculture and the new West -- Voyageurs and habitants: tracing the early French in the Mississippi Valley/ Great Lakes region -- Seminar for beginners -- Innocents abroad: what novices need to be taught -- Panton-Leslie and Company papers: documenting the southeastern Indian frontier and its traders -- Ethnic crossovers: how to use ethnic records to solve "non-ethnic" genealogical problems -- Visual aids or how to show and tell at the same time -- But how do I prove this is the same man [or woman] -- Migration patterns in the old Southwest -- Ethnic crossovers: The Freedman's Bureau -- NGS new member orientation -- American divorce records -- Urban research in northern cities -- Beyond the lecture; energizing classroom presentations -- Mississippi Department of Archives and History: efficient use by genealogists and librarians -- Research in New Jersey -- Strange handwriting and even stranger spelling: how to read early handwritten documents -- Ethnic crossovers: Protestant records in Catholic records; lower Mississippi

Valley and West Florida under France and Spain -- By river and by road: family history research in Arkansas -- Civil War claims; Southern Claims Commissions -- How to conduct effective courthouse research -- Irish research: homework here, footwork abroad -- Federal records for Great Lakes area research -- Folk cemeteries of the rural South -- Migration across the lower South: Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana -- Urban research in Midwestern cities -- Ship passenger lists at the National Archives, 1820-1954 -- Tracking elusive ancestors: there's no such thing as "too poor to trace!" -- Genealogical numbering systems: which is best for your publication? -- Rooting around the money tree: society fund raising and financial management -- Abstracting workshop: property and other conveyances -- Researching Spanish archives without going to Spain: microfilm resources of the historic New Orleans collection -- Government publications for the genealogist: federal, state, and local -- Resources in the Midwest for tracing your German immigrant ancestor -- Organizing societies for action -- How to write a good genealogy book -- German migrations to the Gulf Coast: 18th and 19th centuries -- Revolutionary War service on the northern and southern borders: our Canadian, French and Spanish supporters -- Looking to the future

with computers -- Beyond service and pension records: an in-depth look at Union and Confederate records in the National Archives -- Research in Mississippi courthouses -- Indian removal records and the Dawes Commission -- Twentieth century research methodology: locating the living -- The novice prepares advertising -- Research in the Fort Worth field branch of the National Archives -- Over-the- mountain folks: early migrations to Tennessee and Kentucky -- Fort Smith [Arkansas]: Little Gibraltar on the Arkansas -- Genetic roots: family health research and the genealogist -- U.S. maps and migration trails -- Canadian resources for American research -- Using court records effectively: some case studies in New England -- Spanish record along the southwestern border -- From genealogy to history: placing your ancestors in their own place and time -- Using tax rolls to document births, marriages, deaths, migrations, and relationships -- Desktop publishing -- New England town records -- Early diseases, epidemics, and terminology of the 19th century -- National Archives material outside Washington, D.C. -- Use of land records to solve New England genealogical problems -- Loyalist records of the Canadian provinces, 1783-1820 -- Effective cash flow management by a genealogist who actually makes a living at it -- Uncle Billy Bottoms

of Cherokee County, Texas: an evaluation of American Indian records -- Negotiating book and magazine contracts.

The conference was held in Biloxi, Mississippi, on April 27-30, 1988.

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