Change Can Be a Good Thing

November 26, 2013  - by 

From time to time, I get emails from some of you asking why FamilySearch is going through so much change. I’ve thought a lot about that question and know from personal experience that sometimes change can be difficult. This is especially true with the tools and services that are so dependent on technology. It can be very difficult for those of us who didn’t grow up using the tools of technology to keep up with this ever-evolving revolution.

At FamilySearch, one of the biggest challenges we face is balancing the human cost of change with the opportunities that exist to help our patrons access the greatest number of historical records, as easily and as quickly as possible–and still keep our services available to the public at no cost. This is no small challenge, and we deal with it every day.

It has been said that every organization is perfectly aligned to get the results it is getting. Because one major component of the FamilySearch strategic vision is to make family history more engaging for greater numbers of people, we’ve outlined several changes we need to make, including:

  • Make family history centers a place of discovery for the whole family
  • Enable family history experiences that don’t require access to technology
  • Create engaging new online experiences for all skill levels

In the context of that strategy, you’ll continue to see changes to FamilySearch.org and to FamilySearch operations worldwide.

Today, we are presented with some astounding opportunities to make the process of gathering, preserving, and accessing the world’s records so much easier than it was only a few years ago. I remember very well what it was like to do family history research only 25 years ago. To get the information you needed for an ancestor often required a person to send away a stamped letter to a clerk or minister with a check for several dollars for a single certificate. We had to wait a week or two—sometimes longer—to get a response. That process was repeated over and over again. Doing family history research was a slow, drawn out process and was often very expensive. But because of the changes that have taken place, people can now have access literally to billions of records and can do it from the comfort of their homes. They can literally search through all these records in a matter of minutes. It is a remarkable time to be a family historian.

Yes, FamilySearch is making a lot of changes, and we will continue to do so because we want to give you the best of what we have to offer. We never change just for the sake of change. Every change we make is carefully reviewed to determine if it will provide the greatest service to our patrons. It will be considered only if it increases the ease and efficiency of finding and organizing one’s family history. Our goal is to make it as easy as possible for you to do your family history. It’s that simple.

We know that the only constant is that things constantly change; so, to keep up with new technology, an increased user base, and volumes of records, we have worked hard providing patrons with some excellent resources:

  • Before we make a change, we often ask hundreds of volunteer FamilySearch patrons to test a new process or a new product. These are everyday patrons like you who are very good at telling us what works and what doesn’t work. These folks are very good at helping us work off the rough edges before we introduce a change to the general public.
  • We have several newsletters and a FamilySearch blog to help announce changes and provide details of what those changes mean. These announcement provide useful information and links to online training.
  • FamilySearch has dozens of professionally trained instructional developers who create hundreds of excellent videos, online classes, printable paper products, and other products to help you learn everything you need to know to get the most out of your FamilySearch experience.
  • We also have an extensive networks of thousands of support people who provide one-on-one help where needed. Many of them are volunteers located throughout the world to help people in their local areas.
  • Anyone using FamilySearch can visit the online help center and discover an amazing selection of useful classes, videos and other help.
  • A volunteer named Leland Moon has created dozens of quick, easy-to-use videos to help demonstrate many popular FamilySearch features. Each video is only a few minutes long and is easy to follow.

Yes, FamilySearch is changing, and it will continue to change. Our intent is that each change makes it easier for you to find a record, a photograph, or a story that helps you find your ancestors. If we can do that, then we will be happy with the changes we bring about—and be confident you will be, too.

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Comments

    1. FamilySearch “changes”:
      Yes, change is a good and needs to be kept up on a continuing basis. No business, organization, group or person can “grow” and flourish without change. Many of us who have lived a lot of years tend to resist change. I call that the “old shoe” syndrome. We like what is comfortable and that does not raise our anxiety level so we resist change. It’s like that very comfortable pair of old shoes, they might be nearly falling apart but we resist parting with them because they’re comfortable. The technology is changing so rapidly, we have to do our best to keep up with it. Personally, I am absolutely delighted and extremely grateful for all the remarkable changes in FamilySearch. When they first started the beta version of FamilyTree, I threw up my hands and said I could never work with it. It was cumbersome and a royal pain in the backside in the beta version. Now, FamilyTree is a real joy in my life. I can go to an ancestor’s individual “person page”, click on the “search” link and it looks specifically for that individual’s related documents that can be attached to the sources list. I really disliked Roots Magic in their earlier versions. Now, I love using this version because all the attached sources are easily access on FamilyTree directly through Roots Magic.

      Change isn’t just “good” ~~~ it’s outstanding! Bring it on 😉

  1. Whilst videos are all the rage these days I actually find them quite annoying – there’s nothing like text to be able to recheck what you’ve done is correct. Also I quite often read things during my lunch hour at work – I can’t watch the videos as it would disturb others.

  2. FamilySearch CHANGE this: REQUIRE an active email address for the privilege of having a FamilySearch account!

    How can I ,”collaborate on ancestors” with someone I can’t contact through an active email address who makes inaccurate changes to our shared family tree? I have 30 + years of research with documents, records and sources to conclusions. Yet, in a matter of minutes the family tree can be mutilated by an unknown unaccountable person with bad data or no data. How can any well sourced tree be preserved for generations?

    1. I agree…it’s crazy. It can be a simple solution to require a contact visible on all accounts…but for some strange reason the lawyers think they need not require it. Every other site does..so should FAMILYSEARCH. It’s driving people away.

    2. I have found it least upsetting to only add names to Family Tree, as I reserve & do the associated temple work. If I add the name, then reserve it, & complete the work, then I try not to stress if someone else without documents/sources/proof, & usually without a way to contact them, changes something. If it was correct when the work was done, that is what is most important to me. The rest is fluff.